SemesterFall Semester, 2019
DepartmentJunior Class of Department of Sociology Senior Class of Department of Sociology
Course NameContemporary Chinese Society
InstructorHU LI-CHUNG
Credit3.0
Course TypeElective
Prerequisite
Course Objective
Course Description
Course Schedule

Course schedule (* denotes required readings for undergraduate students; graduate students are expected to read all the assigned materials)



Week 19/13Moon Festival (No class)



Week 29/20Post-Mao era



Documentary: China: A Century of Revolution 1976-1994



*Nee, V. (1989). A theory of market transition: From redistribution to markets in state socialism. American Sociological Review, 663-681.



Week 39/27Poverty and Inequality (1)



*Xie, Y., & Zhou, X. (2014). Income inequality in today’s China. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(19), 6928-6933.



Student presentation



Nee, V. (1991). Social inequalities in reforming state socialism: between redistribution and markets in China. American Sociological Review, 267-282.



Novokmet, F., Piketty, T., Yang, L., & Zucman, G. (2018, May). From communism to capitalism: Private versus public property and inequality in China and Russia. In AEA Papers and Proceedings (Vol. 108, pp. 109-13).



Wan, G. (2007). Understanding regional poverty and inequality trends in China: methodological issues and empirical findings. Review of Income and Wealth, 53(1), 25-34.



Week 410/04Poverty and Inequality (2)



China’s parliament has about 100 billionaires, according to data from the Hurun Report



*Dickson, B. J. (2003). Red capitalists in China: The party, private entrepreneurs, and prospects for political change. Cambridge University Press. Introduction.



Willy Lam, “The Rise of the Red Capitalists.” The New York Times, October 26, 2007.



       (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/26/opinion/26iht-edlam.1.8067870.html?pagewanted=all)



Student presentation



Barton, D., Chen, Y., & Jin, A. (2013). Mapping China’s middle class. McKinsey Quarterly, 3, 54-60.



Hannum, E., & Zhang, Y. (2012). Poverty and proximate barriers to learning: vision deficiencies, vision correction and educational outcomes in rural Northwest China. World development, 40(9), 1921-1931.



Wu, X., & Xie, Y. (2003). Does the market pay off? Earnings returns to education in urban China. American Sociological Review, 425-442.



Week 510/11Double Tenth Day (No class)



Week 610/18Internal migration



Documentary: Last Train Home



*Chan, K. W. (2009). The Chinese hukou system at 50. Eurasian geography and economics, 50(2), 197-221.



Gaetano, A. M., & Jacka, T. (2004). On the move: Women and rural-to-urban migration in contemporary China. Columbia University Press. Introduction&ch1. (Electronic resource available in the library)



Student presentation



Keung Wong, D. F., Li, C. Y., & Song, H. X. (2007). Rural migrant workers in urban China: living a marginalised life. International Journal of Social Welfare, 16(1), 32-40.



Xu, H., & Xie, Y. (2015). The causal effects of rural-to-urban migration on children’s well-being in China. European sociological review, 31(4), 502-519.



 



Week 710/25International migration



Documentary: China’s Millionaire Migration (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZs2i3Bpxx4)



*Orrenius, P., Zavodny, M., & Kerr, E. (2012). Chinese immigrants in the US labor market: Effects of post?Tiananmen immigration policy. International Migration Review, 46(2), 456-482.



Student presentation



Bodomo, A. (2010). The African trading community in Guangzhou: An emerging bridge for Africa–China relations. The China Quarterly, 203, 693-707.



Liu?Farrer, G. (2009). Educationally channeled international labor mobility: Contemporary student migration from China to Japan. International Migration Review, 43(1), 178-204.



Thunø, M., & Pieke, F. N. (2005). Institutionalizing recent rural emigration from China to Europe: New transnational villages in Fujian. International Migration Review, 39(2), 485-514.



Week 811/01Gender Issues (1)



*Ebenstein, A. (2010). The “missing girls” of China and the unintended consequences of the one child policy. Journal of Human Resources, 45(1), 87-115.



Student presentation



den Boer, A. M., & Hudson, V. M. (2004). The security threat of Asia's sex ratios. SAIS Review of International Affairs, 24(2), 27-43.



Fong, V. L. (2002). China's One?Child Policy and the Empowerment of Urban Daughters. American Anthropologist, 104(4), 1098-1109.



Hesketh, T., Zhou, X., & Wang, Y. (2015). The end of the one-child policy: lasting implications for China. Jama, 314(24), 2619-2620.



Trent, K., & South, S. J. (2011). Too many men? Sex ratios and women's partnering behavior in China. Social Forces, 90(1), 247-267.



Week 911/08Gender Issues (2)



*Hannum, E., Kong, P., & Zhang, Y. (2009). Family sources of educational gender inequality in rural China: A critical assessment. International journal of educational development, 29(5), 474-486.



Student presentation



Fincher, L. H. (2014). Leftover women: The resurgence of gender inequality in China. Zed Books. Introduction,



Sun, S., & Chen, F. (2015). Reprivatized womanhood: Changes in mainstream media's framing of urban women's issues in China, 1995–2012. Journal of Marriage and Family, 77(5), 1091-1107.



Yan, Y. (2009). The individualization of Chinese society (Vol. 77). Oxford: Berg. Introduction & chapter 6.



Zhang, Y., Hannum, E., & Wang, M. (2008). Gender-based employment and income differences in urban China: Considering the contributions of marriage and parenthood. Social Forces, 86(4), 1529-1560.



Week 1011/15Proposal presentations and discussion (1)



Week 1111/22Proposal presentations and discussion (2)



Week 1211/29Education



Documentary: Two Million Minutes



*Hannum, E., Behrman, J., Wang, M., & Liu, J. (2008). Education in the reform era. China’s great economic transformation, 215-49.



Wan, Y. (2006). Expansion of Chinese higher education since 1998: Its causes and outcomes. Asia Pacific Education Review, 7(1), 19-32.



Student presentation



Mo, D., Yi, H., Zhang, L., Shi, Y., Rozelle, S., & Medina, A. (2012). Transfer paths and academic performance: The primary school merger program in China. International Journal of Educational Development, 32(3), 423-431.



Tam, T., & Jiang, J. (2015). Divergent urban-rural trends in college attendance: State policy bias and structural exclusion in China. Sociology of Education, 88(2), 160-180.



Young, N. A., & Hannum, E. C. (2018). Childhood Inequality in China: Evidence from Recent Survey Data (2012–2014). The China Quarterly, 236, 1063-1087



Week 1312/06Health



Documentary: China’s Health Care Crisis, New York Times



 (https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/07/world/asia/chinas-health-care-crisis.html)



*Gong, P., Liang, S., Carlton, E. J., Jiang, Q., Wu, J., Wang, L., & Remais, J. V. (2012). Urbanisation and health in China. The Lancet, 379(9818), 843-852.



Xiang, Y. T., Yu, X., Sartorius, N., Ungvari, G. S., & Chiu, H. F. (2012). Mental health in China: challenges and progress. The Lancet, 380(9855), 1715.



Student presentation



Charlson, F. J., Baxter, A. J., Cheng, H. G., Shidhaye, R., & Whiteford, H. A. (2016). The burden of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders in China and India: a systematic analysis of community representative epidemiological studies. The Lancet, 388(10042), 376-389.



Li, Y., Xu, J., Wang, F., Wang, B., Liu, L., Hou, W., ... & Lu, Z. (2012). Overprescribing in China, driven by financial incentives, results in very high use of antibiotics, injections, and corticosteroids. Health affairs, 31(5), 1075-1082.



Hsieh, N. (2015). Economic Security, Social Cohesion, and Depression Disparities in Post-transition Societies: A Comparison of Older Adults in China and Russia. Journal of health and social behavior, 56(4), 534-551.



Qin, X., Li, L., & Hsieh, C. R. (2013). Too few doctors or too low wages? Labor supply of health care professionals in China. China Economic Review, 24, 150-164.



Sun, Q., Santoro, M. A., Meng, Q., Liu, C., & Eggleston, K. (2008). Pharmaceutical policy in China. Health Affairs, 27(4), 1042-1050.



Week 1412/13 Social movements



*Yang, D. L. (2006). Economic transformation and its political discontents in China: authoritarianism, unequal growth, and the dilemmas of political development. Annu. Rev. Polit. Sci., 9, 143-164.



Student presentation



Deng, Y., & Yang, G. (2013). Pollution and protest in China: Environmental mobilization in context. The China Quarterly, 214, 321-336.



Zeng, J. (2014). The Politics of Emotion in Grassroots Feminist Protests: A Case Study of Xiaoming Ai's Nude Breasts Photography Protest Online. Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, 41-52.



Zhao, D. (2000). State-society relations and the discourses and activities of the 1989 Beijing student movement. American Journal of Sociology, 105(6), 1592-1632.



Week 1512/20Political regimes and governance



*Lee, C. K., & Zhang, Y. (2013). The power of instability: unraveling the microfoundations of bargained authoritarianism in China. American Journal of Sociology, 118(6), 1475-1508.



Student presentation



Cai, Y. (2008). Power structure and regime resilience: contentious politics in China. British Journal of Political Science, 38(3), 411-432.



Landry, P. F., Lü, X., & Duan, H. (2018). Does performance matter? Evaluating political selection along the Chinese administrative ladder. Comparative Political Studies, 51(8), 1074-1105.



MacKinnon, R. (2011). China's" networked authoritarianism". Journal of Democracy, 22(2), 32-46.



Nathan, A. J. (2003). Authoritarian resilience. Journal of Democracy, 14(1), 6-17.



Stockmann, D., & Gallagher, M. E. (2011). Remote control: How the media sustain authoritarian rule in China. Comparative Political Studies, 44(4), 436-467.



Week 1612/27Student presentation (1)



Week 171/03Student presentation (2)


Teaching Methods
Teaching Assistant
Requirement/Grading

Grading



Oral presentation (15% each, 30% total): Two oral presentations on selected papers are required for every student. Presenters need to prepare for a 20 minute oral presentation using Powerpoints. The Powerpoint file should be sent to me before Thursday at 13:00 PM.



Final paper proposal presentation (15%): Each graduate student/group of undergraduate students is expected to prepare a 10 minute final paper proposal presentation. The purpose of this presentation is to help students develop their final paper project thorough brainstorming with classmates. Students should send a 2-page proposal to all students before November 7th. Students are also expected to prepare comments and suggestions for discussion.



Final paper (40%): Each graduate student/group of undergraduate students is expected to write an empirical paper with original data analysis, either quantitative or qualitative. An intensive literature review paper on a topic for later investigation is also accepted. A copy of the paper should be submitted on the course website by January 14th. For presentation, please prepare for a 20 minute presentation with slides.



Class participation (15%): Regular class attendance, reading assigned materials before class and active participation in class are necessary.


Textbook & Reference
Urls about Course
Attachment