SemesterFall Semester, 2019
DepartmentMA Program of Ethnology, First Year MA Program of Ethnology, Second Year
Course NameComparative Indigenous Law
InstructorKUAN DA-WEI
Credit3.0
Course TypeElective
Prerequisite
Course Objective
Course Description
Course Schedule

WEEK PROGRAMME



 



Day 1
































Time



Topic / Content



Presenter and Location



9:00am – 9:30am



Welcome & Introductions Course Overview and Learning Objectives



 



 



 



 



9:30am – 12:00am



SESSION 1 – WHAT is INDIGENITY?



 



Key Learning Outcomes:




  • Understand and appreciate legal and and cultural categories under international and Natonal Law and M?ori as the tangata whenua of Aotearoa/New Zealand



 



SESSION 2 – Customary law as part of the legal system



 



Key Learning Outcomes:




  • Understanding and conceptualizing indigenous customary law in the modern state and how it might relate to state legal systems

  • Understand and appreciate legal pluralism and different types of legal systems



 



 



Guy Charlton, AUT Faculty of Business, Economics and Law



 



Venue: AUT Business School



 



 



 



 



1:30pm – 4:30pm



SESSION 3contact and colonisation



 



Key Learning Outcomes:




  • Identify and critique the legal issues relevant to the historical and contemporary understandings of English colonization and the implications for indigenous law in Common law states



 



 



 




 



Assigned Readings:



Alex Frame and Paul Meredith “Performance and Maori Customary Legal Process” (2005) Journal of the Polynesian Society vol 114, 135-155



Benton, Lauren. Law and Colonial Cultures: Legal Regimes in World History 1400-1900 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002) pp. 1-30, 167-209



Hirini Moko Mead, Tikanga M?ori: living by M?ori values (Huia Publishers, Wellington, 2016) pp. 1-35, Chapters 16 & 17.



Robert A. Williams, Jr.  Savage Anxieties: The Invention of Western Civilization; Moyers and Company “American Indians Confront "Savage Anxieties" Interview with Robert A. Williams, Jr. University of Arizona https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24IeWTVX840



John C. Weaver, Great Land Rush and the Making of the Modern World, 1650-1900 (Montreal: McGill Queens University Press 2003) pp 11-87



Connolly v. Woolrich and Johnson et al., 1 C.N.L.C. 70 (1867)



Kauwaeranga Judgement 1984 14 UVWLR 227



Johnson v M'intosh 21 U.S. 543 1823



Worcester v. Georgia, 31 U.S. (6 Pet.) 515 (1832)



R. v. Symonds, [1847] N.Z.P.C.C. 387 (N.Z.S.C.).



Wi Parata v. Bishop of Wellington (1877) 3 N.Z. Jur. (NS) 72 (N.Z.C.A.)



 Catherine's Milling and Lumber Company v The Queen, 14 App. Cas. 46 (1888)



 



Day 2 



 





































Time



Topic / Content



Presenter and Location



9:00am – 10:30am



SESSION 4 – The Treaty of waitangi and its implications in New Zealand Law and Policy



 



Key Learning Outcomes:



Understand and appreciate the impact of the Treaty of Waitangi on New Zealand law



 



10:30am – 11:00 am



Break



 



11:00 am – 12:30pm



 



1:30-4:30



Session 5 - - Rights: land, resources and environmental law



 



Key Learning Outcomes:




  • Identify key legal and policy issues relevant to  Indigenous Peoples in land and resource law



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 




 



Assigned Readings:



 



Richard Boast, “Maori and the Law, 1840-2000” in Peter Spiller, Jeremy Finn and Richard Boast, A New Zealand Legal History, chapter 4.



 



Philip A Joseph, Constitutional and Administrative Law in New Zealand, 4th Edition (Bookers, Wellington,2014) pp. 41-108



 



Tom Bennion, “Treaty-Making in The Pacific in the Nineteenth Century and the Treaty Of Waitangi” 35 VUWLR 165



 



Takamore v Clarke [2012] NZSC 116



 



Proprietors of Wakatu v Attorney-General [2017] NZSC 17 (Ellis CJ Decision, paras. 340-391)



 



The Environment Guide [Law Foundation], Maori and Environmental Law & The Resource Management Act (RMA) http://www.environmentguide.org.nz/rma/planning-documents-and-processes/



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



Day 3 





































Time



Topic / Content



Presenter and Location



9:00am – 12:30pam



 



SESSION 6 – Indigenous Peoples and Criminal justice



 



Key Learning Outcomes:



Analyse issues Australia’s and New Zealand’s law and policy problems involving the criminal justice system in a comparative context



 



 



 



10:30am – 11:00am



Break



 



11:00am – 12:30pm



SESSION 7 Historical Justice, Reconcilation and Treaty Settlements



 



Key Learning Outcomes:




  • Analyse the Treaty settlement process

  • Undertstanding underlying principles and problems with historical justice and reconciliation



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 




 



 



Assigned Readings



 



Khylee Quince, “Maori and the Criminal Justice System” in Julia Tolmie and Warren Brookbanks, Criminal Justice in New Zealand, chapter 12.



Bush Law, Message Stick (ABC1 Melbourne); Availability: < https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=TEX20101206063;res=TVNEWS> [cited 13 Jan 17]. Also found at Aboriginal Bush Law - My Country Australia  (Parts 1 and 2) - BBC Culture Documentary. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sEWFKE59JFw.



Nicola Wheen and Janine Hayward, Treaty of Waitangi Settlements (Bridget Williams Books, Wellington 2012), READ: Chapter 2 [“Negotiations and Settlements, Michael Belgrave] and Chapter 5 [“Apologies in Settlements”, Maureen Hickey]



Marine and Coastal Area (Takutai Moana) Act 2011, ss 4-7. 26-8, 46-7, 51-6, 58-62, 77-9,82, 94-5, 98 http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2011/0003/latest/DLM3213131.html



Resource Management Act 1991 ss. 2, 5-8 http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1991/0069/latest/DLM231915.html



Te Awa Tupua (Whanganui River Claims Settlement) Act 2017  http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2017/0007/latest/whole.html



Robert Sparrow, ‘History and Collective Responsibility’ (2000) 78(3) Australasian Journal of Philosophy 346



J. Waldron, ‘Redressing Historic Injustice’ (2002) 52 University of Toronto Law Journal 135 



 



 



 



Day Four
































9:00am – 10:30am



 



SESSION 8 – Philosophical and legal Basis of Group And Indigenous



 



10:30am – 10:30am



Break



 



10:39am – 12:00pm



SESSION 9international instruments



 



Key Learning Outcomes:




  • Compare and contrast the law and policy response to M?ori and other indigenous peoples with the obligations set out in international instruments



 



 



12:00am – 1:00pm



Lunch



 



1:00 – 4:00 pm



SESSION 10 – the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples



 



Key Learning Outcomes:




  • Analyse the rights and policies for Indigenous Peoples outlined under the Declaration and policy response to M?ori and other indigenous peoples with the obligations set out in international instruments



 



 




 



Assigned Readings



Patrick Hayden, The Philosophy of Human Rights (St. Paul, Mn: Paragon Books, 2001) pp 427-462



M. Odette, ‘The evolution of rights: Indigenous peoples in international law’ (2009) 13 Australian Indigenous Law Review 140



Marcelle Burns, “The ‘natural’ law of nations: society and the exclusion of First Nations as subjects of international law” in Watson, 2017



United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples



International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination



Universal Declaration of Human Rights, G.A. Res. 217 (III) A, U.N. Doc. A/RES/217(III) (Dec. 10, 1948)



International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights



Siegfried Wiessner, “The Cultural Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Achievements and Continuing Challenges” (2011) 22 European Journal of International Law  (1):121-140



GENERAL COMMENTS BY COMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC,  SOCIAL  AND  CULTURAL  RIGHTS No. 21 (2009) http://www.refworld.org/docid/4ed35bae2.html



GENERAL COMMENTS ADOPTED BY THE HUMAN RIGHTS COMMITTEE Comment 23, http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/treatybodyexternal/Download.aspx?symbolno=HRI%2fGEN%2f1%2fRev.9%20(Vol.%20I)&Lang=en



James Anaya and Siefgried Wiessner, “The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Towards Re-empowerment” The Jurist Oct 3, 2007 International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination http://www.jurist.org/forum/2007/10/un-declaration-on-rights-of-indigenous.php



Kirsty Gover, “Settler-State Political Theory, CANZUS and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples” European Journal of International Law, Vol. 26, Issue 2 (May 2015), pp. 345-374



 



 



Day 5 





































Time



Topic / Content



Presenter and Location



9:00am – 10:00am



 



SESSION 11 Indigenous Rights and the Asia Pacific  



 



Key Learning Outcomes:




  • Understand issues involving indigenous peoples in some states in the Asia Pacific  (Taiwan)



 



 



 



10:00am – 10:30am



Break



 



10:30am – 12:00pm



 



SESSION 12 Indigenous Rights and the Asia Pacific  



 



Key Learning Outcomes:




  • Understand issues involiving indigenous peoples in some states in the Asia Pacific (Fiji & PNG)



 



Understand and appreciate M?ori custom law



 



 



 



12:00am – 1:00pm



Lunch



 



1:00pm – 4:00pm



PresentaTions and Discussion



 



 




 



 



Required Readings:



 



2017 “The law relating to hunting and gathering rights in the traditional territories of Taiwan’s indigenous peoples”, Asia Pacific Law Review, 25:2, 1-24.



 



Dominic O’Sullivan “Between Indigenous Paramountcy and Democracy:



How Differentiated, Citizenship and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples



Could Help Fijian Self-determination”  Australian Journal of Politics and History: Volume 64, Number 1, 2018, pp.129-141. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/ajph.12


Teaching Methods
Teaching Assistant
Requirement/Grading

Assessment information



All students should obtain a copy of the Graduate and Undergraduate Handbook  which includes information on:



Academic integrity



Attendance



Assignments (format, presentation, referencing*, submission)



Exams (regulations, schedule)



Assessment (return of assessments - handback, uncollected assessments, reconsideration)



Results 



*Referencing must adhere to the rules and conventions set out in McLay, Murray, Orpin, New Zealand Law Style Guide (2nd ed The Law Foundation 2011)



In addition the following rules apply:



Font: Times New Roman (12 pt) (except footnotes which must be in Times New Roman (10 pt));



Spacing: Double line spacing;



Paper: White, A4 size paper (no greater than 80gsm);



Pages: Each page (other than the cover sheet) must be numbered and printed in portrait;



Margins: 2.5cm left margin, 2.5cm top, right and bottom margin;



Coversheet: The mandated School of Law coversheet must be affixed to the front of any submission (hardcopy or electronic) and must be accurately completed without any omission; and



Footnotes: Are to be single spaced and in 10pt font.



 



Assessment structure



 

























Item



% of mark allocation



General information



Due date



15 minute presentation on chosen research topic with research  questions (Friday)



15%



 



 



One 3000 word essay on the indigenous law of an Asia Pacific



 



85%



 



Paper due _____




 



Note that you are required to submit the following versions of the assignment by the stipulated deadline:




  1. The soft copy assignment must be submitted electronically through Turnitin (on Blackboard)

  2. The hard copy assignment is to be submitted using the Bar-coded assignment coversheets



 



 



Reconsideration



You are entitled to make a formal request for reconsideration of marks in cases where you believe your assessment work has not been marked in accordance with published marking criteria. This request can only be made when assessed work is returned, or during handback. There is a strict process to follow – refer to the Assessment and Study Handbook for details. Note that, where assessments have been submitted electronically, you normally only have 24 hours from the time the graded assessment is made available on Blackboard to apply for reconsideration.



 



Exam schedule



All exam schedules are available on Blackboard, under “My Organisations”, via the Exams & Handback tab.  Visit the student computer kiosks on WF1 and WF7 to view the schedules, or go to Blackboard (https://blackboard.aut.ac.nz).



 



Pass requirements



In order to gain a pass in this paper you must:



Obtain an overall mark of 50%.



 


Textbook & Reference

Required and recommended reading



Required and Recommended Readings will be posted on Blackboard. It is expected that students will complete all required reading and come prepared to discuss the assigned reading prior to class.



There is no prescribed textbook, however, the following texts will be useful throughout the course:



Anaya, S. James, Indigenous peoples in international law  (Oxford University Press, 2004) Second edition.



Irene Watson, ed, Indigenous peoples as subjects of international law (New York, Routledge,2018)



RECOMMENDED TEXTS & READINGS



Philip A Joseph, Constitutional and Administrative Law in New Zealand, 4th Edition (Bookers, Wellington,2014) pp. 41-108



Hirini Moko Mead, Tikanga M?ori: living by M?ori values (Huia Publishers, Wellington, 2016) pp. 1-35, Chapters 16 & 17.



Paul Havemann, “Lessons from indigenous knowledge and culture: learning to live in harmony with nature in an age of ecocide” in Minority Rights Group International,  State of the World’s Indigenous People http://minorityrights.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/MRG-SWM-2016.pdf



Collin Tukuitonga, “Access to Health Services by Indigenous Peoples in the Pacific Region” United Nations: State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, 2nd Volume, pp 131-157. http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/2015/sowip2volume-ac.pdf



The Environment Guide [Law Foundation], Maori and Environmental Law & The Resource Management Act (RMA) http://www.environmentguide.org.nz/rma/planning-documents-and-processes/



Helen Harvey, “$42 billion Maori economy about more than just Treaty settlements” Feb. 3, 2017.



http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/88915435/maori-economy-about-more-than-just-treaty-settlements



Waitangi Tribunal Report 2014  The Report on Stage 1 of the Te Paparahi o Te Raki Inquiry, Chapter 7 (The negotiation and signing of Te Tiriti),  pp407-441, 497-429 https://www.waitangitribunal.govt.nz/inquiries/district-inquiries/te-paparahi-o-te-raki-northland/



Hirini Moko Mead, Tikanga M?ori : living by M?ori values (Huia Publishers, Wellington :, 2016  



Ani Mikaere,  Colonising Myths: Maori Realities (Huia Publishers, Wellington, 2011)



Richard S Hill, Maori and the State: Crown-Maori Relations in New Zealand/Aotearoa 1950-2000 (VUP, Wellington, 2009)



Claudia Orange, The Treaty of Waitangi (Bridget Williams Books, Auckland, 2004)



Cleve Barlow, Tikanga Whakaaro: Key Concepts in Maori Culture (OUP, Auckland, 1991)



I H Kawharu, Waitangi: Maori and Pakeha Perspectives of the Treaty of Waitangi



John Patterson, Exploring Maori Values (Dunmore Press, Palmerston North, 1992)



Mason Durie, Nga Tai Matatu (OUP, Auckland, 2005)



Mason Durie, Mauri Ora: The Dynamics of Maori Health (OUP, Auckland, 2001)



New Zealand Law Commission, Maori Custom and Values in New Zealand Law (Study Paper 9)



Selwyn Katene, The Spirit of Maori Leadership (Huia Publishers, 2013)



Carwyn Jones, New Treaty New Tradition (VUP, Wellington, 2016)



Proprietors of Wakatu v Attorney-General [2017] NZSC 17 [28 February 2017] [2017] [Opinion of Elias J]



Attorney-General v Ngati Apa [2003] 3 NZLR 643 (N.Z.C.A.).



New Zealand Maori Council v Attorney-General, [1987] 1 NZLR 641 (N.Z.C.A.).



 



 


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