SemesterFall Semester, 2019
DepartmentGraduate Institute of Technology, Innovation & Intellectual Property Management, MA Program(TIM), First Year Graduate Institute of Technology, Innovation & Intellectual Property Management, MA Program(TIM), Second Year
Course NameGreen Technology Innovation
InstructorKO YU-CHIA
Credit3.0
Course TypeElective
Prerequisite
Course Objective
Course Description
Course Schedule

Course Schedule:






























































































































































週次



Week



/日期



Date



課程主題



Topic



課程內容與指定閱讀



Content and Reading Assignment



教學活動與作業



Teaching Activities and Homework



學習投入時間



Student workload expectation



課堂講授



In-class Hours



課程前後



Outside-of-class Hours



1: 9/12



Course Overview



Course Syllabus and Policy



Lecture and discussion



3



3



2: 9/19



Introduction to Green Technology Innovation





  • Ch2 of Eco-innovation when sustainability and competitiveness shake hands. Carrillo-Hermosilla J., del González P.R., Könnölä T. (2009).



  • Green innovation in technology and innovation management – an exploratory literature review. Schiederig et al. (2012).



Lecture, term project assignment and grouping



3



6



3: 9/26



Developments and Directions of Green Technology Innovation




  • Why Sustainability Is Now the Key Driver of Innovation. HBR. (2009/9).

  • Ch1 of Eco-Innovation and the Development of Business Models. S. Azevedo et al. (2014).



Lecture and discussion



3



6



4: 10/3



Green Technology Innovation and Circular Economy




  • How Businesses Can Support a Circular Economy. HBR. (2016/2).

  • Disruptive Technology as an Enabler of the Circular Economy: What Potential Does 3D Printing Hold? California Management Review. (2018/01).



Lecture and discussion



3



6



5: 10/10



國慶日放假 National Day



6: 10/17



Green Technology Innovation in Industry




  • Ch1. Framing Eco-Innovation: The Concept and the Evolution of Sustainable Manufacturing. OECD (2010).

  • Green and Competitive: Ending the Stalemate. HBR. (1995/09).



Lecture and discussion



3



6



7: 10/24



Green Technology Innovation in Production and Processes




  • Patagonia: Driving Sustainable Innovation by Embracing Tensions. Berkeley Haas Case. (2/16/2016).

  • Driving Eco-innovation: A Breakthrough Discipline for Innovation and Sustainability. C. Fussler & P. James. (1996).



Lecture and discussion



3



6



8: 10/31



Green Technology Innovation in Products and Services




  • Sustainability Through Open Innovation: Carlsberg and the Green Fiber Bottle. Berkeley Haas Case. (10/1/2018).

  • Driving Eco-innovation: A Breakthrough Discipline for Innovation and Sustainability. C. Fussler & P. James. (1996).



Lecture and discussion



3



6



9: 11/7



Term Project Progress Presentation



Term project progress presentation slides



Group presentation and discussion



3



6



10: 11/14



Policy & Regulation on Green Technology Innovation




  • Ch5. Promoting Eco-Innovation: Government Strategies and Policy Initiatives in Ten OECD Countries. OECD (2010).

  • Which policy instruments to induce clean innovating? Research Policy, 41, 1770-1778. Veugelers, R. (2012).



Lecture and discussion



3



6



11: 11/21



Radical and Systematic Eco-innovation




  • Sustainability-oriented innovation systems – managing the green transformation. Innovation and Development 2(1): 5-22. Altenburg, T. and A. Pegels. (2012).

  • Ch2&5 of Eco-Innovation and the Development of Business Models. S. Azevedo et al. (2014).



Lecture and discussion



3



6



12: 11/28



Developing and Assessing Green Technology Innovation




  • Ch4 of Eco-Innovation and the Development of Business Models. S. Azevedo et al. (2014).

  • Eco-innovate! A guide to eco-innovation for SMEs and business coaches. Eco-Innovation Observatory. EIO and CfSD (2016).



Lecture and discussion



3



6



13: 12/5



Independent Study (1)



Field work for term project



 



 



 



14: 12/12



Green Technology and Eco-Innovative Supply Chain




  • Greening the Supply Chain by Applying LCAs and Environmental Management Systems with a Cluster Approach. Daddi et al. (2014).

  • The Sustainable Supply Chain. HBR. (2010/10).



Lecture and discussion



3



6



15: 12/19



Making Green Technology Innovation a Competitive Strategy




  • Ch3 of Eco-Innovation and the Development of Business Models. S. Azevedo et al. (2014).

  • Green technology innovation: Anatomy of exploration processes from a learning perspective. Business Strategy and the Environment. S. Wicki & E. G. Hansen. (2019).



Lecture and discussion



3



6



16: 12/26



Business Model for Green Technology Innovation




  • Dow Chemical: Innovating for Sustainability, June 2013, HBS Case 112-064.

  • Ch11&12 of Eco-Innovation and the Development of Business Models. S. Azevedo et al. (2014).



Lecture and discussion



3



6



17: 1/2



Term Project Presentation; Course Review and Wrap-up



Term project final presentation slides



Group presentation and discussion



3



6



18: 1/9



Independent Study (2)



Term project final report



 



 



 




 



Requirements:




  • Teaching Activities

    The in-class lecture of this course contains both lecturing and discussion; therefore, students are required to be prepared and participate in class discussion. Please see the above weekly course schedule for each week’s reading assignments. Textbooks are also assigned for references. Students are expected to form into groups for pre-class discussion, and to work on a term project. Each team member should contribute equally to the group, while your contribution will also be evaluated by your team members.


     

  • Homework

    Each student should individually complete a one-page A4 memorandum (memo) each week for the week's topic and assigned reading materials. You will hand in the memos in class the day the topic and reading are discussed. No late memorandums will be accepted. The memorandum should be typed, 11- or 12-point font size, double-spaced, with normal margins, pitch, etc. and should not exceed one page.


     

  • Student Workload Expectation

    This course requires 3 hours of class time each week, while each student should spend 6 hours studying outside of class, including preparation and review.


     

  • Independent Study (1) & (2)

    In order for students to employ the knowledge, concepts, frameworks and tools to real cases with green innovation, this course requires students to conduct a team-based term project, and thus arranges two independent studies for students to carry out the projects. The first independent study is designed for field work such as conducting expert interviews, while the second one is designed to analyze collected data and complete the project final report.


     

  • Term Project Presentation and Report

    For the term project, students are expected to select a real case in the field of green technology innovation, and conduct a critical study on it. The purpose of this project is for student to explore the applications and practices of green technology innovation. Apart from secondary literature, students are suggested to conduct interviews with companies or organizations to collect data/information for the term project. The term project includes three segments, including mid-term project presentation, final project presentation, and final project report.

    1. Mid-term Project Progress Presentation (Presentation on 11/7/2019; Presentation slides due on 11/4/2019 at 23:59)

    Each group will have 15 minutes to present the progress of their project, followed by 5 minutes Q&A. The presentation is suggested to start with the areas of study and motivation to study on these areas. The group leader should submit the presentation slides by deadline.

    2. Final Project Presentation (Presentation on 1/2/2020; Presentation slides due on 12/30/2019 at 23:59)

    The team should prepare a 20 minutes presentation to introduce your case and analysis, followed by 10 minutes Q&A. The group leader should submit the presentation slides by deadline.

    3. Final Project Report (Due on 1/9/2020 at 23:59)

    Each group is required to submit a written report that contains a cover page. The report should be 20 to 30 pages in length (excluding tables, figures, and references). References should be properly cited. The group leader should submit the report (in Word or PDF format) by deadline.



 




  • Course Policies




  1. Assignment and Grading:




  • Assignment is due exactly at the prescribed time. NO late assignment is accepted.

  • Any questions regarding the grading of an assignment or report must be raised within one week after the score is made available.

  • All assignments and reports should be your original work/concept.

  • The grading policy will be strictly enforced. NO make-up examination/assignment will be provided.

  • Students are responsible for their own learning and performance. The outcome will be reflected on your final grade. The lecturer is not responsible on any of student’s arguments and will not change the grade.




  1. Attendance:




  • The attendance will be recorded in every single class.

  • If you come in class late or leave early, your attendance counts a half only.

  • Student leave (whether casual or sick leave) exceeding 3 classes in the semester will automatically results in FAIL in the final grade. Please follow the university's formal procedure for taking a leave, and notify the instructor by email beforehand or as soon as possible.




  1. Seating: You are required to present your name tent in front of your seat for helping the lecturer record the attendance and in-class performance.

  2. Penalty for cheating and plagiarism will be extremely severe. Use your best judgment. If you are not sure about certain activities, please consult the instructor. Standard academic honesty procedure will be followed, while active cheating and/or plagiarism automatically result in a FAIL in the final grade.

  3. You are expected to come prepared to discuss the assigned readings for every class and responsible for everything discussed in class. Note your attendance and participation counts. You may receive a zero for absence or lack of participation.

  4. Using laptop, tablet PC or mobile/smart phone is prohibited in this class unless instructor request for lecturing purpose.

  5. Pay very careful attention to your e-mail correspondence. It reflects your communication skills. Avoid use non-standard English in your e-mail message. In addition, it is recommended to indicate the class name and a brief summary of your question in the e-mail subject. For example, Subject: GTI - A question on homework. I immediately discard anonymous e-mails.

  6. The ringing, beeping, buzzing of cell phones during class time is extremely rude and disruptive to your fellow students and to the class flow. Please turn all cell phones off or into silent mode prior to the start of class.

  7. For any disability accommodations needed for the course, please do not hesitate to notify the instructor for assistance.

  8. Information on this syllabus is subject to change with prior announcement. Any updates on the syllabus such as course topic, content or reading materials will be posted here on Friday by 14:00 for next class.



 


Teaching Methods
Teaching Assistant

N/A


Requirement/Grading

  • In-class participation 30% (individual-based)

  • Homework assignment 20% (individual-based)

  • Term project 50% (group-based with consideration of individual participation)

    • Mid-term project presentation 15%

    • Final project presentation 15%

    • Final project report 20%




Textbook & Reference

Altenburg, T. and A. Pegels. (2012): Sustainability-oriented innovation systems - managing the green transformation. Innovation and Development 2(1): 5-22.



Berkeley Haas Case. (2/16/2016). Patagonia: Driving Sustainable Innovation by Embracing Tensions.



Berkeley Haas Case. (10/1/2018). Sustainability Through Open Innovation: Carlsberg and the Green Fiber Bottle.



C. Fussler & P. James. (1996). Driving Eco-innovation: A Breakthrough Discipline for Innovation and Sustainability.



California Management Review. (2018/01). Disruptive Technology as an Enabler of the Circular Economy: What Potential Does 3D Printing Hold?



Carrillo-Hermosilla, Javier.; Río González, Pablo del.; Könnölä, Totti. (2009). Eco-innovation when sustainability and competitiveness shake hands. Palgrave Macmillan, London.



EIO and CfSD. (2016). Eco-innovate! A guide to eco-innovation for SMEs and business coaches. Eco-Innovation Observatory.



Harvard Business Review. (1995/09). Green and Competitive: Ending the Stalemate.



Harvard Business Review. (2009/9). Why Sustainability Is Now the Key Driver of Innovation.



Harvard Business Review. (2010/10). The Sustainable Supply Chain.



Harvard Business Review. (2016/2). How Businesses Can Support a Circular Economy.



HBS Case 112-064. Dow Chemical: Innovating for Sustainability, June 2013.



OECD. (2010). Eco-Innovation in Industry: Enabling Green Growth.



S. Azevedo et al. (2014). Eco-Innovation and the Development of Business Models.



S. Wicki & E. G. Hansen. (2019). Green technology innovation: Anatomy of exploration processes from a learning perspective. Business Strategy and the Environment. https://doi.org/10.1002/bse.2295



Schiederig et al. (2012). Green innovation in technology and innovation management – an exploratory literature review. R&D Management, 42(2): 180-192.



Veugelers, R. (2012). Which policy instruments to induce clean innovating? Research Policy, 41, 1770-1778.



 


Urls about Course
N/A
Attachment