SemesterFall Semester, 2019
DepartmentSophomore Class of Department of Arabic Language and Culture
Course NameIntroduction to the Arab History and Literature
InstructorSU I-WEN
Credit2.0
Course TypeRequired
Prerequisite
Course Objective
Course Description
Course Schedule

Schedule




  1. 1. September 13       Moon Festival

  2. 2. September 20                     Induction and Introduction; Before Islam: Near East in Late Antiquity

  3. 3. September 27                     Before Islam: Near East in Late Antiquity (Quiz)

  4. 4. October 4                 Early Islamic Polity: Mu?ammad and His Successors  

  5. 5. October 11              National Day

  6. 6. October 18               Early Islamic Polity: Mu?ammad and His Successors (Quiz)

  7. 7. October 25               Early Islamic Polity: Mu?ammad and His Successors

  8. 8. November 1                        The Civil Wars and the Umayyads

  9. 9. November 8          Midterm Examination

  10. 10. November 15                      The Civil Wars and the Umayyads (Quiz)

  11. 11. November 22                     The Early ?Abb?sid Caliphate

  12. 12. November 29                     The Early ?Abb?sid Caliphate (Quiz)

  13. 13. December 6             The ?Abb?sids and the Rise of Regional Dynasties

  14. 14. December 13                       Muslims in Spain and North Africa

  15. 15. December 20                      Muslims in Spain and North Africa (Quiz)

  16. 16. December 27                      Muslims in Spain and North Africa

  17. 17. January 3  Final Examination


Teaching Methods
Teaching Assistant

x


Requirement/Grading

Evaluation



Midterm Exam — 30%



Final Exam 30%



Quizzes — 40%



 



*Please note that cheating in an exam under any circumstance is not acceptable. If you are caught cheating, you will be failed.



 



*Eating and photography are not allowed during the lecture.


Textbook & Reference

 



Before Islam: Near East in Late Antiquity



 



Set Reading (Quiz on September 27)




  • Conrad, Lawrence I. “The Arabs.” In The Cambridge Ancient History. Volume XIV. Late Antiquity: Empire and Successors, A.D. 425–600. Edited by Averil Cameron, Bryan Ward-Perkins, and Michael Whitby. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000, 678–695.

  • Kennedy, Hugh. The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates. London: Longman, 1986, 1–29.



 



See also



Berkey, J. P. The Formation of Islam. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003, 3–49.



Hoyland, R. Arabia and the Arabs from the Bronze Age to the Coming of Islam. London, 2001, 85–166.



Finster, B. “Arabia in Late Antiquity: An Outline of the Cultural Situation in the Peninsula at the Time of Muhammad.” In The Qur??n in Context: Historical and Literary Investigations into the Qur?anic Milieu. Edited by Angelika Neuwirth, Nicolai Sinai and Michael Marx. Leiden: Brill, 2010, 61–114. 



 



Further Reading Suggestions



Encyclopaedia Iranica, ?ARAB i. Arabs and Iran in the pre-Islamic period”, “Zoroastrianism i. Historical Review up to the Arab Conquest”, “Class System iii. in the Parthian and Sasanian Periods”, “Iran ix. Religions in Iran (1) Pre-Islamic”, et al.



Encyclopaedia of Islam, 2nd edition and Encyclopaedia of Islam Three (EI2 and EI3), ‘Abraha’, ‘Ghassan’, ‘Himyar’, ‘al-Hira’, ‘Kinda’, ‘Lakhm’, et al.



The Cambridge History of Iran. Volume 3(2): The Seleucids, Parthian, and Sasanian Periods. Edited by Ehsan Yarshater. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983.



The Cambridge Ancient History. Volume XIV. Late Antiquity: Empire and Successors, A.D. 425–600. Edited by Averil Cameron, Bryan Ward-Perkins, and Michael Whitby. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.



Fisher, G. Between Empires: Arabs, Romans, and Sasanians in Late Antiquity. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.



Fowden, G. Empire to Commonwealth: Consequences of monotheism in late antiquity, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993.



Fowden, G. Before and after Muhammad: The First Millennium Refocused. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014.



Howard-Johnston, J. “The Great Powers on the Eve of Islamic Conquest.’ In Les préludes de l’Islam: Ruptures et continuités dans les civilisations du Proche-Orient, de l’Afrique orientales, de l’Arabie et de I’Inde à la veille de l’Islam. Edited by Christian Julien Robin and Jérémie Schiettecatte. Paris: De Boccard, 2013, 37–56.



 



 



Early Islamic Polity: Mu?ammad and His Successors



 



Set reading (Quiz on October 18)




  • Kennedy, Hugh. The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates. London: Longman, 1986, 15–75.

  • Berkey, J. P. The Formation of Islam, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003, 3–69.



 



See also



Brown, J.A. Hadith: Muhammad’s Legacy in the Medieval and Modern World. Oxford: One World, 2009, 15–23, 197–239.



Cook, Michael. Muhammad. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983, 61–76



Crone, P., ‘What do we actually know about Muhammad?’, openDemocracy, 10 June 2008 (1st published 31 August 2006), http://www.opendemocracy.net/faith-europe_islam/mohammed_3866.jsp.



Raven, W. “S?ra”, in EI2 (Encyclopaedia of Islam, 2nd edition; accessible via Library Catalogue)



Hoyland, Robert. Seeing Islam as Others Saw It: A Survey and Evaluation of Christian, Jewish and Zoroastrian Writings on Early Islam. Princeton: Darwin Press, 1997, 523–544.



 



Donner, Fred M. The Early Islamic Conquests. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1981, 221–250, 267–272.



Kennedy, Hugh. The Great Arab Conquests: How the Spread of Islam Changed the World We lived In. Philadelphia: Da Capo Press, 2007, 344–376.



Levy-Rubin, M. Non-Muslims in the Early Islamic Empire: From Surrender to Coexistence. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011, 8–57. 



 



Further Reading Suggestions



Cook, Michael. The Koran: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.



Donner, Fred M. “Modern Approaches to Early Islamic History.” In The New Cambridge History of Islam Volume 1: The Formation of the Islamic World, Sixth to Eleventh Centuries. Edited by Chase F. Robinson, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010, 623–647.



Hoyland, Robert G. In God’s Path: The Arab Conquests and the Creation of an Islamic Empire. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015.



Ibn Ishaq (d. 767). The life of Muhammad: a translation of Ibn Ishaq’s Sirat Rasul Allah. Translated by A. Guillaume. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1955.



Kennedy, Hugh. The Armies of the Caliphs: Military and Society in the Early Islamic State. London: Routledge, 2001.



Watt, M. Muhammad: Prophet and Statesman. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1961.



The Qur’an, surat Maryam (Q. 19).



 



 



The Civil Wars and the Umayyads



 



Set Reading (Quiz on November 15)




  • Kennedy, Hugh. The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates. London: Longman, 1986, 75–122.

  • Berkey, Jonathan P. The Formation of Islam. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003, 76–90.

  • Hawting, Gerald. “Umayyads” in Encyclopaedia of Islam, 2nd edition.



 



See also



Crone, Patricia. Medieval Islamic Political Thought. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2004, 17–47.



Hawting, Gerald. The First Dynasty of Islam.  London: Routledge, 2000, 21–103.




  1. , Heinz. Shi‘ism. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1995, 5–27.



Momen, Moojan. An Introduction to Shi‘i Islam. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985, 11–26, 61–75.



Robinson, C. F. ‘Abd al-Malik. Oxford: Oneworld, 2005, 58–118.



George, A. “Paradise or Empire? On a Paradox of Umayyad Art. In Power Patronage and Memory in early Islam: Perspectives on Umayyad Elites. Edited by A. George and A. Marsham. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, 39–67.



Marsham, A. ‘“God’s Caliph” Revisited: Umayyad Political Thought in Its Late Antique Context.” Power Patronage and Memory in early Islam: Perspectives on Umayyad Elites. Edited by A. George and A. Marsham. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, 3–37.



 



Further Reading Suggestions



Blankinship, Khalid Yahya. The End of the Jih?d State: The Reign of Hisha?m ibn ?Abd al-Malik and the Collapse of the Umayyads. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1994.



Duri, ‘Abd al-‘Az?z. Early Islamic Institutions: Administration and Taxation from the Caliphate to the Umayyads and  ?Abb?sids. Translated by the Centre for Arab Unity Studies for Razia Ali. London: Tauris, 2011.



Grabar, Oleg. The Dome of the Rock. Cambridge, Mass: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2006



Humphreys, R. Stephen. Mu‘awiya ibn Abi Sufyan: The Saviour of the Caliphate. Oxford: Oneworld, 2006.



The New Cambridge History of Islam Volume 1: The Formation of the Islamic World Sixth to Eleventh



Centuries. Edited by Chase F. Robinson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.



Morony, M. G. Iraq After the Muslim Conquest. New Jersey: Gorgias, 2005.



 



 



The Early ?Abb?sid Caliphate



 



Set reading (Quiz on November 29)




  • Kennedy, Hugh. The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates. London: Longman, 1986, 124–157.

  • Hawting, Gerald. The First Dynasty of Islam.  London: Routledge, 72–118.



 



See also



Munt, Harry. “Caliphal Imperialism and ?ij?z? elites in the second/eighth Century.” Al-Mas?q 28-1 (2016): 6–21.



Kennedy, Hugh. “Central Government and Provincial E?lites in the Early ?Abba?sid caliphate.” Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies 44-1 (1981): 26–38.



Kennedy, Hugh. The Early Abbasid Caliphate: a Political History. London: Croom Helm, 1981, 18–34, 176–197.



Tillier, M. “Legal Knowledge and Local Practices under the Early ?Abb?sids.” In History and Identity in the Late Antique Near East 500–1000. Edited by Philip Wood. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, 187–204.



Zaman, Muhammad Qasim, “The Caliphs, the ?Ulam??, and the Law: Defining the Role and Function of the Caliph in the Early ?Abb?sid Period.” Islamic Law and Society, 4-1(1997): 1-36.



 



Further Reading Suggestions



Berkey, Jonathan P. The Formation of Islam. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003, 91–176.



Lewis, Bernard. “Abbasids (Banu ‘l-‘Abbas)” in EI2.



Crone, Patricia. Medieval Islamic Political Thought. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2004, 70–98, NB, too, the charts at 401–4.



Crone, Patricia. Slaves on Horses: The Evolution of the Islamic Polity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1980.



Daniel, E. The Political and Social History of Khurasan under Abbasid Rule 747–820. Minneapolis: Bibliotheca Islamica, 1979.



Humphreys, R. S. Islamic History: A framework for inquiry. London and New York: I.B. Tauris, 1991, 104–27.



 



 



The ?Abb?sids and the Rise of Regional Dynasties



 



Set Reading




  • Kennedy, Hugh. The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates. London: Longman, 1986, 158–284.



 



See also



BBC Radio 4, ‘The Translation Movement’, In Our Time podcast, available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00dp4d8



Bennison, A. The Great Caliphs: The Golden Age of the ‘Abbasid Empire. London: I.B. Tauris, 2009, 158–202.



Gutas, D. Greek thought, Arabic culture: the Graeco-Arabic translation movement in Baghdad and early ?Abbasid society (2nd-4th/8th-10th centuries). London: Routledge, 1998, 28–60.



Saliba, G. Islamic Science and the Making of the European Renaissance. Cambridge: Mass., 2007, 1–129.



 



Further Reading Suggestions



Crone, Patricia. Medieval Islamic Political Thought. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2004.



Kennedy, Hugh. “The decline and fall of the first Muslim empire,” Islam 81-1(2004): 10–16.



Gordon, Matthew S. The Breaking of a Thousand Swords: A History of the Turkish Military of Samarra (A.H. 200–275/815–889 C.E.). Albany: State University of New York Press, 2001.



Kennedy, Hugh. The Armies of the Caliphs: Military and Society in the Early Islamic State. London: Routledge, 2001.



Momen, Moojan. An Introduction to Shi‘i Islam. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985



Northedge, A. “S?marr??”, in EI2.



Waines, David. “The Third Century Internal Crisis of the Abbasids.” Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient 20-3 (1977): 282–306.



Zaman, Muhammad Qasim. Religion and Politics under the Early ?Abb?sids: The Emergence of proto-Sunn? Elite. Leiden: Brill, 1997.



 



Muslims in Spain and North Africa



 



Set Reading




  • Moreno, E. “The Iberian Peninsula and North Africa.” In The New Cambridge History of Islam. Edited by Chase Robinson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010, 581-621.

  • García Sanjuán, Alejandro, “al-Andalus, political history”, in Encyclopaedia of Islam, THREE,

  •  



See also



Kennedy, H. Muslim Spain and Portugal: A Political History of al-Andalus. New York: Routledge, 2014, 30–108.



Goddard, H. A History of Christian-Muslim Relationships. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000, 79–108.



Crone, Patricia. Medieval Islamic Political Thought. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2004, esp. 87–124, 197–218.



Madelung, W. “Isma‘iliyya: History, Pre-F??imid and F??imid Times” and “Doctrine: Pre-F??imid and F??imid Times” in EI2.



Brett, Michael. The Fatimid Empire. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2017, 17–83.



Halm, Heinz. Shi‘ism. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1995, 162–205.



 



Further Reading Suggestions



Daftary, F. The Isma?ilis: Their History and Doctrines. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.



Halm, Heinz. Shi‘ism. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1995.



Halm, Heiz. The Empire of the Mahdi: the Rise of the Fatimids. Leiden: Brill, 1996



Momen, Moojan. An Introduction to Shi‘i Islam. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985, 86–104.



Newman, Andrew J. Twelver Shiism. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2013.



Molina, L. “Umayyads.” In EI2.



Watt. W. M. and P. Cachia. A History of Islamic Spain. New Brunswick: Aldine Transaction, 2008.



Clarke, N. The Muslim Conquest of Iberia: Medieval Arabic Narratives. London: Routledge, 2012.



Fletcher, Richard. Moorish Spain. London: Phoenix, 2001.



The Art of the Umayyad Period in Spain (711–1031), available at: https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/sumay/hd_sumay.htm



Safran, Janina. The Command of the Faithful in Al-Andalus: A Study in the Articulation of Caliphal Legitimacy.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 30-2 (1998): 183-198.



Safran. Janina M. “Identity and Differentiation in Ninth-Century Al-Andalus.” Speculum 76-3 (2001): 573-598.



Rouighi, Ramzi. “The Berbers of the Arabs.” Studia Islamica 106-1 (2011): 49-76.



 


Urls about Course
Supplementary Reading Atlases Ruthven, Malise, and Azim Nanji. Historical Atlas of the Islamic World. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. Kennedy, Hugh. A Historical Atlas of Islam. Leiden: Brill, 2002. General Bosworth, Clifford E. The New Islamic Dynasties. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1996. Crone, Patricia. Medieval Islamic Political Thought. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2004. Encyclopaedia of Islam, various editors, 2nd edition (EI2), Leiden: Brill, 1960–2004; 3rd edition in progress. Humphreys, R. Stephen. Islamic History: A Framework for Inquiry. London: Tauris, 1991. Lapidus, Ira M. Islamic Societies to the Nineteenth Century: A Global History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Rippin, Andrew. Muslims: Their Religious Beliefs and Practices, 4th edition, Abingdon: Routledge, 2012. Specific Bennison, Amira. The Great Caliphs: The Golden Age of the ‘Abbasid Empire. London: Tauris, 2009. Hoyland, Robert. Seeing Islam as Others Saw It: A Survey and Evaluation of Christian, Jewish and Zoroastrian Writings on Early Islam. Princeton: Darwin Press, 1997. Humphreys, R. Stephen. Mu‘awiya ibn Abi Sufyan: The Saviour of the Caliphate. Oxford: Oneworld, 2006. Ibn Ishaq (d. 767). The Life of Muhammad: A Translation of Ibn Ishaq’s Sirat Rasul Allah. Translated by A. Guillaume. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1955. Robinson, Chase F. ‘Abd al-Malik. Oxford: Oneworld, 2005. Watt, William Montgomery. Muhammad: Prophet and Statesman. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1961. Online Resources (students swill be instructed to use these resources with caution) This is an excellent collection of materials on Islamic History (also on medieval history): http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/islam/islamsbook.asp For Islamic religious texts in translation, see: http://www.usc.edu/org/cmje/religious-texts/home/ This website from the University of Zurich converts Muslim to Christian dates and vice versa: http://www.oriold.uzh.ch/static/hegira.html The scholarly Encyclopaedia Iranica (‘Encyclopedia of Iran’) is freely available: http://www.iranicaonline.org/ BBC Radio 3’s recent series The Islamic Golden Age includes 20 episodes discussing aspects of Islamic history in depth: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03jyxbb/episodes/guide BBC Radio 4’s In Our Time also has some good discussions of various aspects of Islamic History: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006qykl The web does tend to invite rather uncritical, superficial, and passive reading. Read it as critically as you would a printed text and always consider the credibility of the source. It cannot be over-emphasized that information and ideas derived from research on the web must be properly referenced and that copying and pasting from the web into your work is plagiarism and will be taken very seriously indeed by the University authorities.
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