SemesterFall Semester, 2019
DepartmentMA Program of English, First Year Ph.D. Program in English Literature, First Year MA Program of English, Second Year Ph.D. Program in English Literature, Second Year
Course NameBritish Fiction and the Gothic Imagination 1764-1847
InstructorWU YIH DAU
Credit3.0
Course TypeElective
Prerequisite
Course Objective
Course Description
Course Schedule






















































































































週次



課程內容與指定閱讀



教學活動與課前、



課後作業



學生學習投入時間



(含課堂教學時數)



Week 1 (12th September)



Introduction



After class: read The Castle of Otranto


 

Week 2 (19th September)



The Castle of Otranto



After class: Read Hamm’s essay



3+ 9 hours



Week 3 (26th September)



The Castle of Otranto; ‘Hamlet and Horace Walpole’s The Castel of Otranto’ by Robert Hamm



After class: read Napier’s essay



3+ 9 hours



Week 4 (3rd October)



The Castle of Otranto; ‘Frenzy: The Castle of Otranto’ by Elizabeth Napier



After class: read The Monk



3+ 9 hours



Week 5 (10th October)



National Holiday



 



 



Week 6 (17th October)



The Monk



After class: Read Clemens’s essay



3+ 9 hours



Week 7 ( 24th October)



The Monk; ‘Public Censorship and Personal Repression: The Monk’ by Valdine Clemens



After class: Read Watkins’s essay



3+ 9 hours



Week 8 (31st October)



The Monk; ‘Social Hierarchy in Matthew Lewis’s The Monk’ by Daniel Watkins



After class: read Wuthering Heights



3+ 9 hours



Week 9 (7th November)



Wuthering Heights



After class: read Shannon’s essay



3+ 9 hours



Week 10 (14th November)



Wuthering Heights; ‘Lockwood’s Dreams and the Exegesis of Wuthering Heights’ by Edgar Shannon



After class:



Read Ellis’s essay, “Emily Brontë and the Technology of Self”



3+ 9 hours



Week 11



(21st November)



Wuthering Heights; ‘Emily Brontë and the Technology of Self”’ by Kate Ellis



After class: read Jane Eyre



3+ 9 hours



Week 12



(28th November)



Jane Eyre



After class: read Garofalo’s essay



3+ 9 hours



Week 13



(5th December)



Jane Eyre; ‘Dependent Masters and Independent Servants: The Gothic Pleasures of British Homes in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre’ by Daniela Garofalo



After class: Read DeLamotte’s essay



3+ 9 hours



Week 14



(12th December)



Jane Eyre ; ‘Gothic Romance and Women’s Reality in Jane Eyre’ by Eugenia DeLamotte



After class: prepare for the mini-conference



3+ 9 hours



Week 15 (19th December)



Mini-conference session 1



After class: prepare for the mini-conference or write your term paper



3+ 9 hours



Week 16 (26th December)



Mini-conference session 2 ; term paper due 1



After class: writing your term paper



3+ 9 hours



Week 17 (2nd January)



term paper due 2 ; Individual supervision 1: return term papers (submitted on December 26th) to students and discussing their works with them



 



 



Week 18 (9th January)



Individual supervision 2: return term papers (submitted on January 2nd) to students and discussing their works with them



 



 



Teaching Methods
Teaching Assistant
Requirement/Grading

Requirements and regular in-class activities:



1. Finish reading the required novel and/or critical essays before coming to class.



2. Make presentations on assigned materials and lead discussion (i.e. prepare 1~2 questionsrelated to the assigned texts, respond to your classmates’ answers and offer your own)



3. Our class will regularly begin with student presentations. Discussion and passage analysis will follow. Participate in in-class discussion vigorously.



4. Start thinking about your term paper as early as possible. Discuss your research with the instructor if necessary.



5. At the end of the term, students are required to present their research ideas to the entire class and to produce a research paper in the MLA style.



Grading policies:



Weekly contributions 20%



Mini-conference presentation 10%



Final term paper 70%

 


Textbook & Reference

Textbooks:



All four novels covered in this course are available either in the NCCU library or in major bookstores. Please secure a copy of them either through borrowing from a library or purchasing on-line / in a bookstore. Any edition will do, although a scholarly edition (e.g. Oxford, Norton, Penguin, Broadview … etc.) may be ideal. This is because the explanatory notes and critical introduction in such editions can help students to understand this novel better.



Copies of assigned critical essays can be obtained in the University photocopying centre.


Urls about Course
Attachment