SemesterFall Semester, 2019
DepartmentInternational Master's Program in International Studies, First Year International Master's Program in International Studies, Second Year
Course NameInternational Relations Theory
InstructorHUANG CHIUNG-CHIU
Credit3.0
Course TypeRequired
Prerequisite
Course Objective
Course Description
Course Schedule















































































































































週次



Week



課程主題



Topic



課程內容與指定閱讀



Content and Reading Assignment



教學活動與作業



Teaching Activities and Homework



學習投入時間



Student workload expectation



課堂講授



In-class Hours



課程前後



Outside-of-class Hours



1



Sep/20



Introduction of the course



 



 



Christian Reus-Smit and Duncan Snidal, “Between Utopia and Reality: The Practical Discourses



of International Relations, in The Oxford Handbook of International Relations, edited by Reus-Smit, Christian, and Duncan Snidal. : Oxford University Press, 2008-08-14.



Introducing the structure of the course, the basic understanding of the IR theory, and the purpose of this course.



3



24



2



Sep/27



Realism, Liberalism and Critiques




  1. William Wohlforth, “Realism” & Jack Donnelly, “The Ethics of Realism”

  2. Arthur A. Stein, “Neoliberal Institutionalism” & James Richardson, “The Ethics of Neoliberal Institutionalism”

  3. Andrew Moravcsik, “The New Liberalism” & Gerry Simpson, “The Ethics of New Liberalism”



 



All of above articles are in The Oxford Handbook of International Relations



Discussing and debating Realism and neo-Liberalism in IR



3



24



3



Oct/4



Constructivism, Critical Theories, Post Modernism in IR



 




  1. Ian Hurd, “Constructivism” & Richard Price “The Ethics of Constructivism”

  2. Richard Shapcott, “Critical Theory” & Robyn Eckersley, “The Ethics of Critical Theory”

  3. Anthony Burke, “Postmodernism” & Peter Lawler, “The Ethics of Postmodernism”



All of above articles are in The Oxford Handbook of International Relations



Discussing and debating the three theoretical approaches in IR



3



24



 



October 11



National Holiday



Good News: no class



0



0



4



Oct/18



English School, Marxism, and Feminism




  1. Tim Dunne, “English School” & Molly Cochran, “The Ethics of English School”

  2. Benno Teschk, “Marxism” & Nicholas Rengger, “The Ethics of Marxism”

  3. Sandra Whitworth, “Feminism” & Jacqui True, “The Ethics of Feminism”



 



All of above articles are in The Oxford Handbook of International Relations



Discussing and debating the three theoretical approaches in IR



3



24



5



Oct/25



Imaging the Discipline?



 



 




  1. David Lake, “The State and IR” & Michael Barnette and Kathryn Sikkink, “From IR to Global Society”

  2. Robert Cox, “The Point is not Just to Explain the World but to Change It” & Peter Katzenstein and Rudra Sil, “Eclectic Theorizing in the Study and Practice of IR”

  3. Henry Nau, “Scholarship and Policy Making” & Joseph Nye, “IR: the Relevance of Theory to Practice”



 



All of above articles are in The Oxford Handbook of International Relations



Discussion will be focused on the key issues mentioned in these articles and the relevance to today’s IR and its major concerns



3



24



6



November/1



Midterm Exam



Midterm Exam



Bad News: You shall not pass if you don’t read and show



0



24



7



November/8



Methodologies of IR I




  1. Andrew H. Kydd, “Methodological Individualism and Rational Choice”

  2. Joel Quirk, “Historical Methods”

  3. Andrew Bannett and Colin Elman, “Case Study Methods”



 



All of above articles are in The Oxford Handbook of International Relations



This week’s major purpose of learning is to know how we could make IR theories operationalized and apply the key concepts into our analyses.



3



24



8



November/15



Methodologies of IR II




  1. Friedrich Kratochwil, “Sociological Approaches”

  2. James Goldgeier and Philip Tetlock, “Psychological Approaches”

  3. Edward D. Mansfield and Jon C. Pevehouse, “Quantitative Approaches”



 



All of above articles are in The Oxford Handbook of International Relations



This week’s major purpose of learning is to know how we could make IR theories operationalized and apply the key concepts into our analyses.



3



24



9



November/22



Role Theory and Foreign Policy Analysis




  1. THIES, CAMERON G., AND BREUNING MARIJKE. (2012) Integrating Foreign Policy Analysis and International Relations through Role Theory. Foreign Policy Analysis 8 (1, January): 1-4.



THIES, CAMERON G., AND JULIET KAARBO. (2012) Contested Roles and Domestic Politics: Reflections on Role Theory in Foreign Policy Analysis and IR Theory. Foreign Policy Analysis 8 (1, January): 5-24.




  1. HARNISCH, SEBASTIAN. (2012) Conceptualizing in the Minefield: Role Theory and Foreign Policy Learning. Foreign Policy Analysis 8 (1, January): 47-69.

  2. CANTIR, CRISTIAN and JULIET KAARBO, ‘Unpacking Ego in Role Theory: Vertical and Horizontal Role Contestation and Foreign Policy,’ in Cristian Cantir and Juliet Kaarbo (ed.) Domestic Role Contestation, Foreign Policy, and International Relations (Oxford: Routledge, 2016): 1-22.



 



 



 



Role Theory in Foreign Policy Analysis has been the trend in the late 70s and 80s; yet after “disappearing” for decades, in early 2000s, a bunch of North American and European IR scholars returned to this approach and expanded its scope. This week of class focuses on introducing the basic ideas of role theory in FPA and its evolution since the 2000s.



3



24



10



November/29



Asymmetric Structure and the Small States in IR I




  1. Gigleux, Victor. 2016. “Explaining the Diversity of Small States’ Foreign Policies through Role Theory.” Third World Thematics: A TWQ Journal 1 (1):27-45.

  2. Chong, Alan. 2010. “Small State Soft Power Strategies: Virtual Enlargement in the Cases of the Vatican City State and Singapore.” Cambridge Review of International Affairs 23(3): 383-405.

  3. Long, Thomas S. 2017. “It’s Not the Size, It’s the Relationship: From ‘Small States’ to Asymmetry.” International Politics, 54 (2): 144-160.



It is said that the IRT is designed for understanding the strong powers’ logics of behaviors. However, the real world of IR is composed mainly by smaller political entities. Scholars of IR began reflecting the unbalanced phenomena of the IR research and calling for more studies on small states’ foreign policy makings. This week’s task is to gain a little flavor of this newly emerged discipline.



3



24



11



December/6



Asymmetric Structure and the Small States in IR II




  1. Womack, Brantley. 2016. Asymmetry and International Relationships. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Introduction.

  2. Ibid. Ch.1.

  3. Ibid. Ch.2



The theoretical approach of asymmetric structure provided by Womack helps further understanding the small state’s perceptions in the bilateral relationship with the great power and the psychological as well as physical discrepancy between the weak and the strong.



3



24



12



December/13



Great Power Politics



TBD




  1. Shih, C. Y., and Huang, C. C. (2015) China’s Quest for Grand Strategy: Power, National Interest, or Relational Security? The Chinese Journal of International Politics 8 (1): 1-26.

  2.  



TBD



3



24



13



December/20



The “Turns” in IR




  1. Chih-yu Shih et al. 2019. China and the International Theory: The Balance of Relationships (Oxon & New York: Routledge). Introduction & Ch. 1.

  2. Sasley, Brent E. 2011. “Theorizing State’s Emotions,” International Studies Review 13: 452-476.

  3. Acharya, Amitav and Barry Buzan. (2017) Why is there no Non-Western International Relations Theory? Ten Years On. International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, Volume 17, Issue 3: 341-370



In the 21th Century, new phenomena in international politics have pushed scholars to rethink the applicability of IRT in explaining and resolving problems in real political lives of human beings. There are multiple “turns” in the development of the discipline; in this week, we can only touch upon some of the new trends occurred since the new century, including relational turns, emotional turn, and the reflection of non-Western IR.



3



24



14



December/27



Why and How does the IRT Matter?




  1. Kenneth N. Waltz, Man, the State and War, ch. 1.

  2. J. David Singer, “The Levels of Analysis Problem in International Relations,” World Politics 14 (October 1961): 77-92.

  3. Arnold Wolfers, Discord and Collaboration, ch. 1



After gaining basic knowledge of the IRT, this week we discuss how to make IRT functional for analyzing the issues in real world. We will begin with the so called “three levels of analysis” and talk about the debate related to this metaphor.



3



24



15



January/3



Final Exam



Final Exam



Final Exam



3



24



Teaching Methods
Teaching Assistant
Requirement/Grading







Your performance and final grade for the course will be evaluated as follows:



In Class Presentation 20%



Midterm Exam 30%



Final Exam 40%



Participation 10 %



 



Tips of Passing the Exams



























In Class Presentation




  1. Introducing the content of the reading briefly and concisely.

  2. Reflection of the reading/theoretical approach is required, i.e. your opinion counts and matters.

  3. I will interrupt you if you don’t finish the presentation in 15 mins, and this does impact your score.



Plus:




  1. You will earn more credits if you are able to do comparison with other theoretical approach or theorists’ perspectives.

  2. You can only do the presentation in 15 mins. No more.



Midterm Exam




  1. Answering the Questions! (You got 0 credit by writing nonsense for 10 pages or more)

  2. Try to apply the materials used in class and discussion



Plus




  1. Names of the theorists or titles of the articles and books ever appear in the required readings will help you gain more credits.



Final Exam




  1. Again, Answer the Questions!

  2. There are always questions about current affairs. Try paying more attentions to what’s going on outside of the classroom and the books.

  3. You plagiarize, you die.



Tips




  1. Pretty much like the suggestions given for your midterm.

  2. This is the occasion for you to show not only how much you know about the theories, but how good you are in terms of reflecting the merits and shortcomings of them, and more importantly, how capable you are on applying theories!



Participation



Evaluation made by the instructor and your teammates



Try not to screw up your teammate if you got any.




Requirements




  1. Read the required readings before attending the class.

  2. Most readings will be uploaded to the WM5 E-learning system (or distributed to students depending on the situation). Certain readings will have a copy reserved in the library where students can borrow and read inside of the library (checking out the reserved readings is not allowed).

  3. Participation is not severely required, but if you cannot make it to the class, pls try telling the teacher in advance or at least contact the teacher afterwards.

  4. Class presentation will be proceed in the group form; might be in group if there are more students registered than expected.

  5. Extra copies of the presentation for the audience are not required; power point is not required; format of presentation is not required either, the presenting team can make the call.

  6. Format of both Exams might be negotiable. Will be determined in class. However, there will be EXAMS for sure.



 



Textbook & Reference








  1. Reus-Smit, Christian, and Duncan Snidal ed., 2008. The Oxford Handbook of International Relations (Oxford: Oxford University Press).

  2. Womack, Brantley. 2016. Asymmetry and International Relationships. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.



 



 



Urls about Course
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