SemesterFall Semester, 2019
DepartmentInternational Master's Program in International Studies, First Year International Master's Program in International Studies, Second Year
Course NamePost-Communist Democratization
InstructorLIN YUNG-FANG
Credit3.0
Course TypeElective
Prerequisite
Course Objective
Course Description
Course Schedule

 


































































































































































週次



Week



課程主題



Topic



課程內容與指定閱讀



Content and Reading Assignment



教學活動與作業



Teaching Activities and Homework



學習投入時間



Student workload expectation



課堂講授



In-class Hours



課程前後



Outside-of-class Hours



1



Introduction



 



The weekly topic is assigned with two articles (journal articles or book chapters).



For a detailed syllabus, please see the course attachment.



Discussion



Twice a semester, students must prepare a ten-minute oral presentation, based on one of the assigned articles of their choice.



3



0



2



Theories of Democratization




  • Christian Welzel, “Theories of Democratization,” in Christian W. Haerpfer, et al., eds, Democratization (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009),, ch. 6.

  • Grzegorz Ekiert, “Three Generations of Research on Post-Communist Politics–A Sketch,” East European Politics and Societies and Cultures, Vol. 29, No. 2 (May 2015), pp. 323-337.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



3



Measuring Democracy and Democratization




  • Patrick Bernhagen, “Measuring Democracy and Democratization,” in Haerpfer, et al., eds, Democratization, ch. 3.

  • Michael Coppedge and David Kuehn, “Introduction: Absorbing the Four Methodological Disruptions in Democratization Research?” Democratization, Vol. 26, No. 1 (2019), pp. 1-20.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



4



The Authoritarian Resurgence




  • Martin K. Dimitrov, “Understanding Communist Collapse and Resilience,” in Martin K. Dimitrov, ed., Why Communism Did Not Collapse: Understanding Authoritarian Regime Resilience in Asia and Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013), ch. 1.

  • Thomas Ambrosio, “Beyond the Transition Paradigm: A Research Agenda for Authoritarian Consolidation,” Demokratizatsiya, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Summer 2014), pp. 471-494.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



5



Constitutional Engineering and Democratization




  • Petra Stykow, “The Devil in the Details: Constitutional Regime Types in Post-Soviet Eurasia,” Post-Soviet Affairs, Vol. 35, No. 2 (2019), pp. 122-139.

  • Henry E. Hale, “The Informal Politics of Formal Constitutions: Rethinking the Effects of ‘Presidentialism’ and ‘Parliamentarism’ in the Cases of Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, and Ukraine,” in Tom Ginsburg and Alberto Simpser, eds., Constitutions in Authoritarian Regimes (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2014), ch. 10.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



6



Political Parties and Democratization




  • Sheri Berman and Maria Snegovaya, “Populism and the Decline of Social Democracy,” Journal of Democracy, Vol. 30, No. 3 (July 2019), pp. 5-19.

  • Andrey Semenov, Olesya Lobanova and Margarita Zavadskaya, “When Do Political Parties Join Protests? A Comparative Analysis of Party Involvement in ‘For Fair Elections’ Movement,” East European Politics, Vol. 32, No. 1 (2016), pp. 81-104.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



7



Elections and Democratization




  • Joshua A. Tucker, “Enough! Electoral Fraud, Collective Action problems, and Post-Communist Colored Revolutions,” Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 5, No. 3 (Sept. 2007), pp. 535-551.

  • Alanna C. Van Antwerp and Nathan J. Brown, “The Electoral Model without Elections? The Arab Uprisings of 2011 and the Color Revolutions in Comparative Perspective,” Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Spring 2018), pp. 195-226.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



8



Civil Society and Democratization




  • Larry Diamond, In Search of Democracy (London: Routledge, 2016), ch. 6.

  • Mark R. Beissinger, “ ‘Conventional’ and ‘Virtual’ Civil Societies in Autocratic Regimes,” Comparative Politics, Vol. 49, No. 3 (April 2017), pp. 351-371.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



9



The Media and Democratization




  • Katrin Voltmer and Gary Rawnsley, “The Media,” in Haerpfer, et al., eds, Democratization, ch. 16.

  • Maria Repnikova, “Contesting the State under Authoritarianism: Critical Journalists in China and Russia,” Comparative Politics, Vol. 51, No. 1 (Oct. 2018), pp. 41-60.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



10



Transitional Justice and Democratization




  • Michael Bernhard and Jan Kubik, eds., Twenty Years after Communism: The Politics of Memory and Commemoration (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2014), ch. 1.

  • Aleks Szczerbiak, “Communist-forgiving or Communist-purging?: Public Attitudes towards Transitional Justice and Truth Revelation in Post-1989 Poland,” Europe-Asia Studies, Vol. 69, No. 2 (March 2017), pp. 325-347.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



11



State Governance and Democratization




  • Linda J. Cook & Martin K. Dimitrov, “The Social Contract Revisited: Evidence from Communist and State Capitalist Economies,” Europe-Asia Studies, Vol. 69, No. 1 (Jan. 2017), pp. 8-26.

  • Antoaneta L. Dimitrova, “The Uncertain Road to Sustainable Democracy: Elite Coalitions, Citizen Protests and the Prospects of Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe,” East European Politics, Vol. 34, No. 3 (2018), pp. 257-275.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



12



Economic Development and Democratization




  • Roberto Stefan Foa, “Modernization and Authoritarianism,” Journal of Democracy, Vol. 29, No. 3 (July 2018), pp. 129-140.

  • Hilary Appel and Mitchell A. Orenstein, “Why did Neoliberalism Triumph and Endure in the Post-Communist World?” Comparative Politics, Vol. 48, No. 3 (April 2016), pp. 313-331.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



13



Political Elite and Democratization




  • Alexander Baturo, “From Patronal First Secretary to Patronal President: Post- Soviet Political Regimes in Context,” in Robert Elgie and Sophia Moestrup, eds., Semi-Presidentialism in the Caucasus and Central Asia (London: Palgrave, 2016), ch. 2.

  • Karrie J. Koesel, “Guardians of the Status Quo: Stopping the Diffusion of Popular Challenges to Authoritarian Rule,” Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Spring 2018), pp. 251-284.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



14



Civil-Military Relations and Democratization




  • Zoltan Barany, The Soldier and the Changing State: Building Democratic Armies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2012), ch. 1.

  • Aurel Croissant, David Kuehn, and Tanja Eschenauer, “Mass Protests and the Military,” Journal of Democracy, Vol. 29, No. 3 (July 2018), pp. 141-155.



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



15



Nationalism, Populism, and Democratization




  • Ellen Carnaghan, “From Balcony to Barricade: Nationalism and Popular Mobilisation in Georgia, Ukraine, and Russia,” Europe-Asia Studies, Vol. 68, No. 9 (Nov. 2016), pp. 1579-1607.

  • Cas Mudde and Cristobal Rovira Kaltwasser, “Populism and (Liberal) Democracy: A Framework for Analysis,” in Cas Mudde and Cristobal Rovira Kaltwasser, eds., Populism in Europe and the Americas: Threat or Corrective for Democracy? (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2012), ch. 1.



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



16



External Influence and Democratization




  • Thomas Risse and Nelli Babayan, “Democracy Promotion and the Challenges of Illiberal Regional Powers: Introduction to the Special Issue,” Democratization, Vol. 22, No. 3 (2015), pp. 381-399.

  • Alexander Libman and Anastassia V. Obydenkova, “Understanding Authoritarian Regionalism,” Journal of Democracy, Vol. 29, No. 4 (Oct. 2018), pp. 151-165.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



17



National Holiday



 



 



0



0



18



Final Paper



No reading assignments



Discussion



0



0



Teaching Methods
Teaching Assistant
Requirement/Grading


  • Class participation (25%): Students are expected to attend regularly, to read the assigned readings, and to actively participate in class discussions.




  • Presentations (25%): Each student is required to give three ten-minute oral presentations. The first two are to present reviews of the assigned readings of the weekly topic, and the final one is to present the research proposal of the final paper.




  • Final paper (50%): Each student is required to write a research paper (5,000-8,000 words) related to the topics covered in the course.




Textbook & Reference


  • Christian W. Haerpfer, et al., eds, Democratization




  • Jean Grugel & Matthew Louis Bishop, Democratization: A Critical Introduction, 2nd ed.




  • Nathan J. Brown, ed., The Dynamics of Democratization




  • Larry Diamond et al, eds., Authoritarianism Goes Global: The Challenge to Democracy




  • Valerie Bunce, Michael McFaul and Kathryn Stoner-Weiss, Democracy and Authoritarianism in the Postcommunist World




  • Valerie J. Bunce and Sharon L. Wolchik, Defeating Authoritarian Leaders in Postcommunist Countries




Urls about Course
Attachment

syllabus.pdf