SemesterFall Semester, 2019
DepartmentInternational Master's Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, First Year
Course NameThe Cross Strait Relations between Mainland China and Taiwan
InstructorYUAN I
Credit3.0
Course TypeElective
Prerequisite
Course Objective
Course Description
Course Schedule

 



Week 1



Introduction



 



Week 2



Theories and Approaches (I): General Perspectives



 



Required Readings:



1- Amitav Acharya, International Relations Theory and Cross-Strait Relations, Taiwan Security Research http://www.taiwansecurity.org/IS/Acharya-International-Relations-Theory-and-Cross-Strait-Relations.htm



2- Yu-Shan Wu, “Theorizing on Relations across the Taiwan Strait: Nine Contending Approaches,” Journal of Contemporary China 9:25 (November 2000), pp. 407-428.



3- Alexander L. George, Bridging the Gap: Theory and Practice in Foreign Policy (Washington, D.C.: United States Institute of Peace Press, 1993), chapter. 1.



4- Scott L. Kastner, “IR Theory and the Relationship across the Taiwan Strait,” in Jean-Mare F. Blanchard and Dennis V. Hickey, eds., New Thinking about the Taiwan Issue: Theoretical Insights into its Origins, Dynamics and Prospects (London and New York: Routledge, 2012), pp. 189-201.



*Yana Zuo, Evolving Identity Politics and Cross-Strait Relations: Bridging Theories of International Relations and Nationalism (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), chapter 7.



 



Suggested Readings:



David Kang, “Getting Asia Wrong: The Need for New Analytical Frameworks,” International Security 27, no. 4 (Spring 2003).



M. Taylor Fravel, “International Relations Theory and China’s Rise: Assessing China’s Potential for Territorial Expansion,” International Studies Review 12 (2010): 505-532.



http://taylorfravel.com/documents/research/fravel.2010.ISR.china.expansion.pdf



Knud Erik Jorgensen, International Relations Theory: A New Introduction (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), chapter 1.



 



 



Week 3



Theories and Approaches (II): International, Interaction and Domestic Dimensions



 



Required Readings:



5- Stephen M. Walt, The Origins of Alliances (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1974), chapter 5.



6- Robert Keohane and Joseph S. Nye, Power and Interdependence: World Politics in Transition (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1977, 1989, 2002), chapter 1.



7- Alexander Wendt, Social Theory of International Politics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), chapter 6.



8- Rawi Abdelal et al., “Identity as a Variable,” Perspectives on Politics 4: 4 (December 2006), pp. 695-711.



9- Shiping Zheng, “Making Sense of the Conflict between Mainland China and Taiwan,” in Vendulka Kubalkova, ed., Foreign Policy in a Constructed World (Armonk, New York: M.E. Sharpe, 2001), chapter 8.



*Sebastian Hamback, “Making Cross-Strait Relations: A Constructivist View,” Contemporary Chinese Political Economy and Strategic Relations: An International Journal, Vol. 3, No. 3, Dec. 2017, pp. 1305-1360.



* Graham Allison, Destined for War (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017), chapter 8.



 



Suggested Readings:



Glenn Snyder, “The Security Dilemma in Alliance Politics,” World Politics 36, no. 4 (1984): 461-495.



Thomas J. Christensen, “The Contemporary Security Dilemma: Deterring a Taiwan Conflict,” The Washington Quarterly 25, no. 4 (2002): 7-21.



Steve Chan, China, the US and the Power-Transition Theory: A Critique (London: Routledge, 2008).



Kenneth N. Waltz, Theory of International Politics (New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1979), chapter 3.



T. H. Bao and Yu-Shan Wu, et al., Revisiting Theories on Cross-Strait Relations (in Chinese) (Taipei: Wu Nan Books Co., 2009), chapters 1, 2, 12 and 14



 



Week 4



Roots of Ideological Struggle



 



Required Readings:



10- Barrington Moore, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy (New York: Penguin Books, 1966).



11- Samuel P. Huntington, The Clashes of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1996), chapters 7, 9.



*Chiang Kai-shek, Soviet Russia in China (Taipei: China Publishing Co., 1968).



US State Department, United States Relations with China with Special Reference to the Period of 1944-1949 (Washington, DC: Department of State Public Publication, 1949).



 



Suggested Readings:



Douglas Lemke, “Power Transition Theory and the End of the Cold War,” Journal of Peace Research 34, No. 1 (1997): 23-36.



Victor D. Cha, “Power play: Origins of the U.S. Alliance System in Asia,” International Security 34, no. 3 (Winter 2009): 158-196.



Denny Roy, Taiwan: A Political History (Cornell, 2003), Chapter 5 (Taiwan in the Cold War).



Alan M. Wachman, Why Taiwan? Geostrategic Rationales for China’s Territorial Integrity. (Stanford University Press, 2007), Chapter 6 (From Civil War to Cold War).



Suzanne Pepper, Civil War in China: the Political Struggle, 1945-1949 (2nd Edition) (New York: Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 1999).



Nancy Bernkopf Tucker ed., China Confidential: American Diplomats and Sino-American Relations 1945-1996 (New York: Columbia University Press, 2001).



Mao Tse-tung, “Farewell, Leighton Stuart,” in Selected Works of Mao Tse-tung, Vol. IV (Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1960), pp. 433-450.



Achieve Department, Ministry of Foreign Affair, ed., Declassified Diplomatic Documents: Achieve of the Establishment of China’s Diplomatic Relations, 1949-1955 (in Chinese) (Beijing: China Pictorial Publishers, 2006).



Chiang Kai-shek, Chiang Kai-shek Diaries (Pala Alto, CA. : Hoover Institution, 2004). Michael Szonyi, Cold War Island: Quemoy on the Front Line (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), chapters 1 and 14.



 



 



 



Week 5



Divided Nations Model and Separated States Model



 



Required Readings:



12- List of Divided Nations - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List-of-divided-nations-http://deletionpedia.dbatley.com/w/index.php?title=List_of_divided_nations_%28deleted_04_Mar_2008_at_22:50%29



13- Yung Wei, “From Multi-System Nations to Linkage Communities: A New Conceptual Scheme for the Integration of Divided Nations,” Issues & Studies, 33:10 (October 1997), pp. 1-19.



14- Gregory Henderson, Richard Ned Lebow and John G. Stoessinger, eds., Divided Nations in a Divided World (New York: David Mc Kay, 1974).



15- John J. Metzler, Divided Dynamism: the Diplomacy of Separated Nations, 2nd edition (New York: University Press of America, 2014), chapters 7,8.



16- Lowell Dittmer, “East Asia’s Divided Nations: A Comparative Analysis,” EAI Working Paper No. 162 (2014), http://www.eai.nus.edu.sg/publications/files/EWP162.pdf.



Suggested Readings:



17- Bruce Jacobs, “Taiwan and South Korea: Comparing East Asia’s Two ‘Third-Wave’ Democracies,” Issues and Studies (December 2007): 227-260.



18- Yung-Hwan Jo and Stephan Walker, “Divided Nations and Reunification Strategies,” Journal of Peace Research 9, no. 3 (1972): 247-259.



 



Suggested Readings:



Wei-qun Gu, Conflicts of Divided Nations: the Cases of China and Korea, (Praeger, 1995).



Joungwon Alexander Kim and Carolyn Campbell Kim, “The Divided Nations in the International System,” World Politics 25, no.4 (July 1973): 479-507.



T. H. Bao and Yu-Shan Wu, et al., Revisiting Theories on Cross-Strait Relations (in Chinese) (Taipei: Wu Nan Books Co., 2009), chapters 3 and 4.



Kimie Hara, Cold War Frontiers in the Asia-Pacific (London: Routledge, 2007).



 



Week 6



International Law and International Status: Past and Present



 



Required Readings:



19- Stephen D. Krasner, Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1999), chapter 1.



20- Jacques deLisle, “Taiwan: Sovereignty and Participation in International Organizations,” (July 2011), Foreign Policy Research Institute E-Notes



http://www.fpri.org/enotes/2011/201107.delisle.taiwan.html



21- Bruce Jacobs, “One China, diplomatic isolation and a separate Taiwan,’ in Edward Friedman ed., China Rise, Taiwan’s Dilemmas and International Peace (New York: Routledge, 2006), pp. 85-109.



22- Nancy B. Tucker,” John Foster Dulles and the Taiwan Roots of the Two China Policy,” in Richard H. Immerman, ed., John Foster Dulles and the Diplomacy of the Cold War (New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1990), pp. 235-262.



23- I Yuan, “Norm-centered Constructivism and Cross-Strait Relations,” Issues and Studies, (September 2012), Vol. 48, No. 3, pp. 75-104.



24- Stephen D. Krasner, ed., Problematic Sovereignty: Contested Rules and Political Possibilities (New York: Columbia University Press, 2001), chapters 1 and 6.



25-Tozun Balcheli et al., De Facto States: the Quest for Sovereignty (London and New York: Routledge, 2004), chapter 1.



 



Suggested Readings:



Stephen Krastner, “Who Gets a State, and Why?” Foreign Affairs 88, no. 2 (2009).



T.Y. Wang et al., “Taiwan’s Expansion of International Space: opportunities and challenges,” Journal of Contemporary China 20, no. 69 (March 2011): 249-267.



Czeslaw Tubilewicz, “Friends, Enemies or Frenemies: China-Taiwan Discord in the World Health Organization and its Significance,” Pacific Affairs 85, no. 4 (December 2012): 701-722. http://www.pacificaffairs.ubc.ca/recent-issues/recent-issue-vol-85-no-4-december-2012/



Vincent Wang, “Taiwan’s Participation in International Organizations,” in Edward Friedman, ed., China’s Rise, Taiwan’s Dilemmas and International Peace (New York: Routledge, 2005), pp. 149-173.



Jean-Marie Henckaerts, ed., The International Status of Taiwan in the New World Order: Legal and Political Considerations (London: Kulwer Law International, 1996).



David Ta-wei Lee, The Making of the Taiwan Relations Act: Twenty Years in Retrospect (Hong Kong: Oxford University Press, 2000), chapters 1, 2, 8.



Legal Status of Taiwan http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legal_status_of_Taiwan



The True Legal Status of Taiwan http://www.taiwannation.com.tw/english2.htm



State Succession in International Law, http://www.legalserviceindia.com/articles/insu.htm.



Nagendra Singh, “The UN and the Development of International Law,” in Roberts, Adam and Benedict Kingsbury, eds., United Nations, Divided World (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993), pp. 384-419.



Sigrid Winkler, “Taiwan’s UN Dilemma: To be or not to be, (2012)”, https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/taiwans-un-dilemma-to-be-or-not-to-be/



 



Week 7



ROC’s Mainland China Policy



 



Required Readings:



*DPP’s China Policy under President Tsai Ing-wen



26- Yu-Shan Wu, “Taiwan’s Domestic Politics and Cross-Strait Relations,“ The China Journal 53 (January 2005), pp. 35-60.



27- Lijun Sheng, China and Taiwan: Cross-Strait Relations under Chen Shui-bian (London: Zed Books, 2002).



28- I Yuan, “Cooperation under Anarchy? Paradoxes of the Intra-Chinese Rapprochement,” Issues & Studies, 31:2 (February 1995), pp. 54-66.



29- Chi Su, Taiwan’s Relations with Mainland China: A Tail Wagging Two Dogs (London and New York: Routledge, 2009), chapters 3, 7 and conclusion.



30- Inaugural address of President Tsai Ing-wen, http://english.president.gov.tw/Default.aspx?tabid=1574



31- I Yuan, “Analysis on Ma Ying-jeou’s Inaugural Address: Challenges and Prospects,” China International Strategic Review, (2012), pp. 174-183.



32- Steven M. Goldstein, Taiwan: Asia’s Orphan? NBR Special Report N.62 (2016), http://nbr.org/publications/specialreport/pdf/Free/02102017b/SR62_Taiwan_AsiasOrphan_December2016.pdf.



 



Suggested Readings:



Christopher R. Hughes, “New Trends in Taiwan’s China Policy,” The International Spectator 44, no. 2 (2009): 59-74.



Baohui Zhang, “Taiwan’s New Grand Strategy,” Journal of Contemporary China 20, no. 69 (March 2011): 269-285.



Chen Qimao, “The Taiwan Straits Situation since Ma came to office,” Journal of Contemporary China 20, no. 68 (January 2011): 153-160.



Michael Chase, Taiwan’s Security Policy: External Threats and Domestic Politics (Lynne Rienner, 2008). Chapter 1 (The Puzzle of Taiwan’s Security Policy) and Chapter 5 (Current Defense Policy in Taiwan).



Michael Hsiao and Jiann-Fa Yan, “Taiwan’s New National Identity and Its Impacts on Domestic Party Contention and Cross-Strait Relations,” in I Yuan, ed., Is There a Greater China Identity? (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2007), pp. 93-114.



Alan D. Romberg, “Shaping the Future: Part I: Domestic Developments in Taiwan,” China Leadership Monitor, No. 38, (August 6), 2012. http://www.hoover.org/research/shaping-future-part-i-domestic-developments-taiwan and Part II: “Cross-Strait Relations,” China Leadership Monitor, No. 39, (October 1), 2012, http://www.hoover.org/research/shaping-future-part-ii-cross-strait-relations



Alan D. Romberg, “The 2012 Taiwan Election: Off and Running,” China Leadership Monitor, No. 35, (Sep. 21), 2011. http://www.media.hoover.org/sites/defult/files/documents/ CLM.



Vincent C. Siew, “Cross-Strait at the Turing Point: Rooted in Taiwan but Connected to the World,” in I Yuan, ed., Cross-Strait at the Turning Point: Institution, Identity and Democracy (Taipei: Institute of International relations, 2008), chapter 1.



 



 



Week 8



PRC’s Taiwan Policy



 



Required Readings:



*De facto unification in progress



33- Yun-han Chu, “The Evolution of Beijing’s Taiwan Policy during the Reform,” in Yong Deng and Feiling Wang, eds., China Rising: Power and Motivation in Chinese Foreign Policy (Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, 2004).



34- Quansheng Zhao and Guoli Liu, “Beijing’s Shifting Positions in the New Era of Cross-Taiwan Strait Relations,” in Wei-Chin Lee, ed., Taiwan’s Politics in the 21th Century (New Jersey: World Scientific Publishing Co., 2010), chapter 8.



35- Ji You, “Rapprochement amidst Continued State of War: the Nexus of Politics and Threat of Force in Beijing’s Taiwan Policy.” paper presented at the 2011 Asia-Pacific Security Forum, Institute for National Policy Research (Taiwan), August 26, 2011.



36- Jacques deLisle, “Strait Ahead? China’s Fifth Generation Leaders and Beijing’s Taiwan Policy,” (July 2011), Foreign Policy Research Institute, E-Note http://www.fpri.org/enotes/2011/201107.delisle.chinatransition.pdf



37- Deng Xiaoping, Fundamental Issues in Present Day China (Beijing: Foreign Language Press, 1987), pp. 19-21, 48-52, 93-96.



38- Chi-hung Wei, “China-Taiwan Relations and the 1992 Consensus, 2000-2008,” International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, (June), 2015.



39-Alan D. Romberg, “Cross-Straits: Marking Time,” China Leadership Monitor, No. 53, (Spring, 2017), https://www.stimson.org/content/cross-strait-relations-marking-time.



 



Suggested Readings:



Denny Roy, Return of the Dragon: Rising China and Regional Security (New York: Columbia University Press, Jan. 2013). Chapter Ten (Taiwan in the PRC’s Lengthening Shadow).



Jing Huang, Inseparable Separation: The Making of China’s Taiwan Policy (World Scientific, 2010). Chapters 7-8.



Michael Chase, Taiwan’s Security Policy: External Threats and Domestic Politics (Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 2008). Chapter 4 (China’s Taiwan Policy and Military Modernization since 2000).



Paul Godwin and Alice Miller, China’s Forbearance Has Limits (Washington DC: Institute for National Strategic Studies, 2013): 37-45 (Signaling Case Studies: Taiwan).



John W. Lewis and Litai Xue, Imagined Enemies: China Prepares for Uncertain War (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006). Chapter 8 (Sun Tzu’s Pupils and the Taiwan Challenge).



Dennis Hickey, “Evolving Policy toward Taipei: Engagement or Entrapment?” in I Yuan, ed., Cross-Strait at the Turning Point: Institution, Identity and Democracy (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2008), chapter 9.



Alan D. Romberg, “Following the 18th Party Congress: Moving Forward Step-by-Step,” China Leadership Monitor, No. 40, (January 14), 2013. http://media.hoover.org/documents/CLM40AR.pdf.



Wang Jisi, “China’s Search for a Grand Strategy,” Foreign Affairs, March/April 2011, pp. 69-79.



Michael A. Glosny, “Getting Beyond Taiwan? Chinese Foreign Policy and PLA Modernization,” Strategic Forum, No. 26, INSS, National Defense University, January 2011, http://www.ndu.edu/inss.



Alan D. Romberg, Across the Taiwan Strait: From Confrontation to Cooperation, 2006-2012 (Washington, D.C.: Stimson Center, 2012).



Lee Yi-hu et al., The Taiwan Model of “One Country Two Systems” (in Chinese) (Beijing: Peoples Publisher, 2015).



 



Week 9



Mid-term Exam



 



Week 10



Economic Integration



 



Required Readings:



40- Shelley Rigger and Toy Reid, “Taiwanese Investors in Mainland China: Creating a Context for Peace?” in I Yuan, ed., Cross-Strait at the Turing Point: Institution, Identity and Democracy (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2008), chapter 5.



41- Murray Scott Tanner, Chinese Economic Coercion against Taiwan (Santa Monica, CA.: RAND, 2007). http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/MG507.html



42- Yun-han Chu, “The Political Economy of Taiwan’s Mainland Policy,” in Suisheng Zhao, ed., Across the Taiwan Strait: Mainland China, Taiwan, and the 1995-1996 Crisis (New York: Routledge, 1999).



43- Kenneth S. Lin, “Cross-Strait Economic Integration and Its Impacts on Taiwan’s Society,” in I Yuan, ed., Is There a Greater China Identity? (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2007), pp. 273-300.



44- Ching-chang Chen, “Useful Adversaries: How to Understand the Political Economy of Cross-Strait Security?” in Jean-Mare F. Blanchard and Dennis V. Hickey, eds., New Thinking about the Taiwan Issue: Theoretical Insights into its Origins, Dynamics and Prospects (London and New York: Routledge, 2012), chapter 3.



45- Scott L. Kastner, Political Conflict and Economic Interdependence across the Taiwan Strait and Beyond (Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press, 2009), chapter 6.



 



Suggested Readings:



Richard C. Bush. Uncharted Strait (Washington DC: Brookings, 2013), Chapter 4 (Economic Stabilization).



Daniel Rosen and Zhi Wang, The Implications of China-Taiwan Economic Liberalization (Washington DC: Peterson Institute, June 2011), Chapter 1 (pp. 5-49) and Chapter 5 (pp. 137-149) http://bookstore.piie.com/book-store/5010.html



Shelley Rigger, Why Taiwan Matters: Small Island, Global Powerhouse (Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, 2011). Chapter 6 (An Opportunity Full of Threats: Cross-Strait Economic Interaction).



Hsieh-Chao Chang and Wen-Cheng Lin, , “The Legal Framework for Cross-Strait Economic Normalization,” in I Yuan, ed., Cross-Strait at the Turning Point: Institution, Identity and Democracy ( Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2008), chapter 10.



Kevin G. Cai, ed., Cross-Strait Relations since 1978 (New Jersey: World Scientific Publishing Co., 2011), chapter 6.



You-tien Hsing, Making Capitalism in China: The Taiwan Connection (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998).



Julian Chang and Steve M. Goldstein, eds., Economic Reform and Cross-Strait Relations (New Jersey: World Scientific Publishing Co., 2007).



 



Week 11



Offense/Defense Postures



 



Required Readings:



*.The Department of Defense Indo-Pacific Strategy, 2019, https://media.defense.gov/2019/May/31/2002139210/-1/-1/1/DOD_INDO_PACIFIC_STRATEGY_REPORT_JUNE_2019.PDF.



*Ian Easton, The Chinese Invasion Threat (Washington, DC: Project 2049 Institute, 2017).



*Christopher Walker, Jassia Luding, “”From Soft Power to Sharper Power,” in Sharp Power: Rising Authoritarian Influence, (National Endowment for Democracy Forum Report (December 2017).



46- Christopher J. McCarthy, China’s Anti-Access/Area Denial: The Evolution of Modern Warfare, http://www.usnwc.edu/Lucent/OpenPdf.aspx?id=95&title.



47- Alan M. Wachman, Why Taiwan? Geostrategic Rationales for China’s Territorial Integrity (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2007), chapter 7.



48- John Wilson Lewis and Litai Xue, Imagined Enemies: China Prepares for Uncertain War (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006).



49- Phillip C. Saunders, “The Rebalance to Asia: U.S.-China Relations and Regional Security,” Strategic Forum, No. 281, (August 2013,) http://ndu.edu/inss.



50- I Yuan, “Cooperation and Conflict: The Offense-Defense Balance in Cross-Strait Relations,” Issues & Studies, 33:2 (February 1997), pp. 1-20.



51- Annual Report to Congress: Military and Security Developments involving the PRC 2016, (Washington, D.C.: Office of Secretary of Defense, 2016) http://www.defense.gov/Portals/1/Documents/pubs/2016%20China%20Military%20Power%20Report.pdf.



52- Scott L. Kastner, “Is the Taiwan Strait Still a Flash Point?”, International Security, Vol. 40, No. 3 (Winter 2015/2016), pp. 54-92.



53- Michael D. Swaine, Creating a Stable Asia: an Agenda for a U.S.-China Balance of Power (Washington, D.C.: CEIP, 2016), chapters 1, 2.



 



Suggested Readings:



Steven Tsang, ‘The US Military and American Commitment to Taiwan’s Security,” Asian Survey 52, no.4 (July/August 2012).



Andrew Erickson and David Yang, “On the Verge of a Game-Changer,” Proceedings Magazine 135 (May 2009).



http://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/2009-05/verge-game-changer



Robert S. Ross, “Navigating the Taiwan Strait: Deterrence, Escalation Dominance, and U.S.-China Relations,” International Security 27, no. 2 (Fall 2002): 48-85.



David Lai, Asia-Pacific: A Strategic Assessment (Carlisle, PA.; U.S. War College, 2013)



I Yuan, “Confidence-Building across the Taiwan Strait as a Peace Zone Proposal,” Working Papers by CNAPS Visiting Fellows, Brookings Institution, No.11, 2000, http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/.../northeastasia-yuan.



 



 



Week 12



US-China-Taiwan Triangle Relations



 



Required Readings:



*Lowell Dittmer, China’s Asia: Triangular Dynamics since the Cold War (Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2018), chapter 5.



*Robert Sutter, “Washington’s “Whole-of-Government” Push back against Chinese Challenges,” PAC NET # 26, April 23, 2019, https://www.pacforum.org/sites/default/files/20190423_PacNet_26.pdf.



*Annual Report to Congress: Military and Security Developments involving the PRC 2019 (Washington, DC: Office of the Secretary of Defense, 2019),



https://media.defense.gov/2019/May/02/2002127082/-1/-1/1/2019_CHINA_MILITARY_POWER_REPORT.pdf.



*National Security Strategy of the United States of America (Washington, DC: the White House, 2017), https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/NSS-Final-12-18-2017-0905.pdf.



*Summary of the National Defense Strategy of the United States of America 2018, https://www.defense.gov/Portals/1/Documents/pubs/2018-National-Defense-Strategy-Summary.pdf.



54- Scott L. Kastner, “Mostly Bark, Little Bite? Modeling U.S. Arms Sales to Taiwan and the Chinese Responses,” Issues and Studies, September 2013. http://iiro.nccu.edu.tw/index.php?include=article&id=2922



55- Nancy Bernkopf Tucker and Bonnie Glaser, “Should the US Abandon Taiwan?” Washington Quarterly, Fall 2011, pp. 23-37.



56- Shirley A. Kan and Wayne M. Morrison, “U.S.-Taiwan Relationship: Overview of Policy Issues,” CRS Report for Congress, (April 22, 2014). http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/R41952.pdf



57- Dennis V. Hickey, “Rapprochement between Taiwan and the Chinese Mainland: Implications for American Foreign Policy,” Journal of Contemporary China (March, 2011), 20(69), pp. 231-247.



58- Mark Stokes and Sabrina Tsai, “The United States and Future Policy Options in the Taiwan Strait,” (February 2016), Project 2049 Institute, http://www.project2049.net/documents/Future_US%20Policy%20Options%20in%20the%20Taiwan%20Strait_Project%202049.pdf.



59- Ian Easton, “Strategic Standoff: the US-China Rivalry and Taiwan,” (March 2016), Project 2049 Institute, http://www.project2049.net/documents/Strategic%20Standoff_US_China_Rivalry_Taiwan.pdf/.



60- John J. Mearsheimer, “Say Goodbye to Taiwan,” The National Interest, (March-April 2014), http://nationalinterest.org/article/say-goodbye-taiwan-9931.



61- Richard C. Bush, An One-China Policy Primer (Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, 2017).



62- Richard C. Bush, “Taiwan’s January 2016 Election and Their Implications for Relations with China and the United States,” Asia Working Group Paper 1, (December 2015), https://www.brookings.edu/research/taiwans-january-2016-elections-and-their-implications-for-relations-with-china-and-the-united-states/.



 



Suggested Readings:



Edward Friedman, “China’s Ambitions, America’s Interests, Taiwan’s Destiny and Asia’s Future,” Asian Survey 53, no. 2 (March/April 2013).



Richard C. Bush. Unchartered Strait (Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 2013), Chapters 5-6.



Shelley Rigger, “Why Giving Up Taiwan Will Not Help Us with China,” American Enterprise Institute (November 2011).



http://www.aei.org/article/foreign-and-defense-policy/regional/asia/why-giving-up-taiwan-will-not-help-us-with-china/



Nancy Bernkopf Tucker, ed., Dangerous Strait: The U.S.-Taiwan-China Crisis (New York: Columbia University Press, 2005).



Richard C. Bush, At Cross Purposes: U.S.-Taiwan Relations since 1942 (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2004).



Richard C. Bush, “An American Perspective on Maritime Asia,” a speech delivered at the East China Sea Peace Forum, August 5, 2013, http://www.brookngs.edu/~/media/research/files/speechs/20american%20perspective%20maritime%20asia%20bush.pdf.



Dennis V. Hickey, “US Policy and the New Taiwan,” in I Yuan, ed., Is There a Greater China Identity? (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2007), pp. 319-344.



Lung-chu Chen, The US-Taiwan-China Relationship in International Law and Policy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016)



 



Week 13



Alternative Views on Political History: the Impact of Culture, and Power on Changing Identities



 



Required Readings:



*Ming-sho Ho, Challenging Beijing’s Mandate of Heaven: Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement and Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2019), https://carnegieendowment.org/2018/08/02/activist-legacy-of-taiwan-s-sunflower-movement-pub-.



63- Ya-chung Chang, Cross Strait Integration and Peaceful Development (Taipei: Far Eastern Group, 2011), https://www.amazon.com/Integration-Peaceful-Development.../B01KN..



64- Ya-chung Chang, “A Modest Proposal for a Basic Agreement on Peaceful Cross-Strait Development“, Journal of Current Chinese Affairs, Vol.39, No.1, (2011), http://journals.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/203



65- Douglas Mendel, The Politics of Formosan Nationalism (Berkeley and Los Angles: University of California Press, 1970).



66- George H. Gerr, Formosa Betrayed (London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1966),



http://www.pinyin.info/books/formosabetrayed/index.html.



67- Melissa J. Brown, Is Taiwan Chinese? (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004), chapter 6.



68- Chengxin Pan, “Normative Convergences and cross-Strait Divergence,” in Jean-Mare F. Blanchard and Dennis V. Hickey, eds., New Thinking about the Taiwan Issue: Theoretical Insights into its Origins, Dynamics and Prospects (London and New York: Routledge, 2012), chapter 2.



69- Hui-Ching Chang and Richard Holt, Languages, Politics and Identity in Taiwan (London & New York: Routledge, 2015),



 



Suggested Readings:



Shelley Rigger, “Taiwan’s Rising Rationalism: Generations, Politics, and Taiwanese Nationalism,” East-West Center Washington, Policy Studies 26 (2006).



Shelley Rigger, “Looking toward the Future in the Taiwan Strait: Generational Politics in Taiwan,” SAIS Review of International Affairs 31, no. 2 (Summer-Fall 2011): 65-77.



Robert Ross, “Taiwan’s Fading Independence Movement,” Foreign Affairs 85, no. 2 (March/April 2006): 141-148.



Daniel C. Lynch, ‘Taiwan’s Self-Conscious Nation-Building Project,” Asian Survey 44, no. 4 (July/August 2004).




  1. A. Rubinstein, ed., Taiwan: A New History (Armonk, New York: M.E. Sharpe, 1999).



Danny Roy, Taiwan: A Political History (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003).



 



Week 14



Whither Cross-Strait Relations



 



Required Readings:



*President Tsai’s statement on termination of diplomatic relations with El Salvador (2018-08-21), https://english.president.gov.tw/NEWS/5492.



*Michael J. Mazarr, Timothy R. Heath, Astrid Stuth Cevallos, China and International Order (Santa Monica, Ca.,: RAND, 2018).



*Ryan L. Hass, Cross-Taiwan Strait Relations: Triangular Dynamics (New York: National Committee on American Foreign Policy, 2019).



70- Shelley Rigger, “Strawberry Jam: National Identity, Cross-Strait Relations and Taiwan Youth,” in I Yuan, ed., Is There a Greater China Identity? (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2007), pp. 115-136.



71- Bruce Gilley, “Policy Succession and the Next Cross-Strait Crisis,” Asia Policy, No. 16, (July 2013), pp. 139-159.



72- Phillip C. Saunders and Scott L. Kastner, “Bridge over Troubled Water? Envisioning a China-Taiwan Peace Agreement,” International Security, Vol. 33, No. 4 (Spring 2009), pp. 87-114.



73- Robert Sutter, Taiwan’s Future: Narrowing Strait (May 2011), National Bureau of Research Analysis, http://www.nbr.



74- Shelley Rigger, Why Taiwan Matters (Lanham, MD.: Rowan and Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2011).



75- Richard C. Bush, Uncharted Strait: The Future of China-Taiwan Relations (Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press, 2013), conclusion.



76- Yun-han Chu, “Taiwan’s National Identity Politics and the Prospect of Cross-Strait Relations,” Asian Survey, Vol. 44, Issue 4, (2004), pp. 484-512.



77- Chi-Hao Huang and Patrick James,” Blue, Green or Aquamarine? Taiwan and the Status Quo Preference in Cross-Strait Relations,” The China Quarterly (Sep. 2014), pp.670-692.



78- T. J. Cheng and Wei-chin Lee, eds., National Security, Public Opinion and Regime Asymmetry (New Jersey: World Scientific, 2017), chapter 2.



 



Suggested Readings:



Shelley Rigger, “Taiwan’s democratization and mainland China’s future,” in Zhou, Rigger and White (eds.), Democratization in China, Korea and Southeast Asia? Local and National Perspectives, (Routledge: New York, 2014). Chapter 3.



Bruce Gilley, “Not so dire straits: How the Finlandization of Taiwan benefits US Security,” Foreign Affairs (2009). http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/65901/bruce-gilley/not-so-dire-straits



Richard C. Bush, “The Social Foundation of Taiwan’s Future,” Brookings Institution (June 2010). http://www.brookings.edu/research/speeches/2010/06/13-taiwan-bush



Jacques deLisle, “Vicious Cycles and Virtuous Circles: International Context, Taiwan Democracy and Cross-Strait Relations,” in I Yuan, ed., Cross-Strait at the Turning Point: Institution, Identity and Democracy (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2008), chapter 15.



Ralph A. Cossa, “Identity Challenges and Taiwan-U.S.-China Relations,” in I Yuan, ed., Is There a Greater China Identity? (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2007), pp. 301-318.



 



 



Week 15



Student Presentations (1)



 



Week 16



Student Presentations (2)



 



Week 17



Jan. 07, 2019 Student Presentations (3)



 



Week 18



Papers due



End of semester



Evaluations:



Class Participation and Assignments 30%



Mid-term Exam 30%



Term Paper 40%



 



*All term papers are due no later than the 20th of January, 2020. The length of the term paper is about 15-20 pages with endnotes and bibliography. Late papers will be penalized.



Week 1



Introduction



Week 2



Theories and Approaches (I): General Perspectives



Required Readings:



1- Amitav Acharya, International Relations Theory and Cross-Strait Relations, Taiwan Security Research http://www.taiwansecurity.org/IS/Acharya-International-Relations-Theory-and-Cross-Strait-Relations.htm



2- Yu-Shan Wu, “Theorizing on Relations across the Taiwan Strait: Nine Contending Approaches,” Journal of Contemporary China 9:25 (November 2000), pp. 407-428.



3- Alexander L. George, Bridging the Gap: Theory and Practice in Foreign Policy (Washington, D.C.: United States Institute of Peace Press, 1993), chapter. 1.



4- Scott L. Kastner, “IR Theory and the Relationship across the Taiwan Strait,” in Jean-Mare F. Blanchard and Dennis V. Hickey, eds., New Thinking about the Taiwan Issue: Theoretical Insights into its Origins, Dynamics and Prospects (London and New York: Routledge, 2012), pp. 189-201.



*Yana Zuo, Evolving Identity Politics and Cross-Strait Relations: Bridging Theories of International Relations and Nationalism (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), chapter 7.



Suggested Readings:



David Kang, “Getting Asia Wrong: The Need for New Analytical Frameworks,” International Security 27, no. 4 (Spring 2003).



M. Taylor Fravel, “International Relations Theory and China’s Rise: Assessing China’s Potential for Territorial Expansion,” International Studies Review 12 (2010): 505-532.



http://taylorfravel.com/documents/research/fravel.2010.ISR.china.expansion.pdf



Knud Erik Jorgensen, International Relations Theory: A New Introduction (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), chapter 1.



Week 3



Theories and Approaches (II): International, Interaction and Domestic Dimensions



Required Readings:



5- Stephen M. Walt, The Origins of Alliances (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1974), chapter 5.



6- Robert Keohane and Joseph S. Nye, Power and Interdependence: World Politics in Transition (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1977, 1989, 2002), chapter 1.



7- Alexander Wendt, Social Theory of International Politics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), chapter 6.



8- Rawi Abdelal et al., “Identity as a Variable,” Perspectives on Politics 4: 4 (December 2006), pp. 695-711.



9- Shiping Zheng, “Making Sense of the Conflict between Mainland China and Taiwan,” in Vendulka Kubalkova, ed., Foreign Policy in a Constructed World (Armonk, New York: M.E. Sharpe, 2001), chapter 8.



*Sebastian Hamback, “Making Cross-Strait Relations: A Constructivist View,” Contemporary Chinese Political Economy and Strategic Relations: An International Journal, Vol. 3, No. 3, Dec. 2017, pp. 1305-1360.



* Graham Allison, Destined for War (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017), chapter 8.



Suggested Readings:



Glenn Snyder, “The Security Dilemma in Alliance Politics,” World Politics 36, no. 4 (1984): 461-495.



Thomas J. Christensen, “The Contemporary Security Dilemma: Deterring a Taiwan Conflict,” The Washington Quarterly 25, no. 4 (2002): 7-21.



Steve Chan, China, the US and the Power-Transition Theory: A Critique (London: Routledge, 2008).



Kenneth N. Waltz, Theory of International Politics (New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1979), chapter 3.



T. H. Bao and Yu-Shan Wu, et al., Revisiting Theories on Cross-Strait Relations (in Chinese) (Taipei: Wu Nan Books Co., 2009), chapters 1, 2, 12 and 14



Week 4



Roots of Ideological Struggle



Required Readings:



10- Barrington Moore, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy (New York: Penguin Books, 1966).



11- Samuel P. Huntington, The Clashes of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1996), chapters 7, 9.



*Chiang Kai-shek, Soviet Russia in China (Taipei: China Publishing Co., 1968).



US State Department, United States Relations with China with Special Reference to the Period of 1944-1949 (Washington, DC: Department of State Public Publication, 1949).



Suggested Readings:



Douglas Lemke, “Power Transition Theory and the End of the Cold War,” Journal of Peace Research 34, No. 1 (1997): 23-36.



Victor D. Cha, “Power play: Origins of the U.S. Alliance System in Asia,” International Security 34, no. 3 (Winter 2009): 158-196.



Denny Roy, Taiwan: A Political History (Cornell, 2003), Chapter 5 (Taiwan in the Cold War).



Alan M. Wachman, Why Taiwan? Geostrategic Rationales for China’s Territorial Integrity. (Stanford University Press, 2007), Chapter 6 (From Civil War to Cold War).



Suzanne Pepper, Civil War in China: the Political Struggle, 1945-1949 (2nd Edition) (New York: Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 1999).



Nancy Bernkopf Tucker ed., China Confidential: American Diplomats and Sino-American Relations 1945-1996 (New York: Columbia University Press, 2001).



Mao Tse-tung, “Farewell, Leighton Stuart,” in Selected Works of Mao Tse-tung, Vol. IV (Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1960), pp. 433-450.



Achieve Department, Ministry of Foreign Affair, ed., Declassified Diplomatic Documents: Achieve of the Establishment of China’s Diplomatic Relations, 1949-1955 (in Chinese) (Beijing: China Pictorial Publishers, 2006).



Chiang Kai-shek, Chiang Kai-shek Diaries (Pala Alto, CA. : Hoover Institution, 2004). Michael Szonyi, Cold War Island: Quemoy on the Front Line (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), chapters 1 and 14.



Week 5



Divided Nations Model and Separated States Model



Required Readings:



12- List of Divided Nations - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List-of-divided-nations-http://deletionpedia.dbatley.com/w/index.php?title=List_of_divided_nations_%28deleted_04_Mar_2008_at_22:50%29



13- Yung Wei, “From Multi-System Nations to Linkage Communities: A New Conceptual Scheme for the Integration of Divided Nations,” Issues & Studies, 33:10 (October 1997), pp. 1-19.



14- Gregory Henderson, Richard Ned Lebow and John G. Stoessinger, eds., Divided Nations in a Divided World (New York: David Mc Kay, 1974).



15- John J. Metzler, Divided Dynamism: the Diplomacy of Separated Nations, 2nd edition (New York: University Press of America, 2014), chapters 7,8.



16- Lowell Dittmer, “East Asia’s Divided Nations: A Comparative Analysis,” EAI Working Paper No. 162 (2014), http://www.eai.nus.edu.sg/publications/files/EWP162.pdf.



Suggested Readings:



17- Bruce Jacobs, “Taiwan and South Korea: Comparing East Asia’s Two ‘Third-Wave’ Democracies,” Issues and Studies (December 2007): 227-260.



18- Yung-Hwan Jo and Stephan Walker, “Divided Nations and Reunification Strategies,” Journal of Peace Research 9, no. 3 (1972): 247-259.



Suggested Readings:



Wei-qun Gu, Conflicts of Divided Nations: the Cases of China and Korea, (Praeger, 1995).



Joungwon Alexander Kim and Carolyn Campbell Kim, “The Divided Nations in the International System,” World Politics 25, no.4 (July 1973): 479-507.



T. H. Bao and Yu-Shan Wu, et al., Revisiting Theories on Cross-Strait Relations (in Chinese) (Taipei: Wu Nan Books Co., 2009), chapters 3 and 4.



Kimie Hara, Cold War Frontiers in the Asia-Pacific (London: Routledge, 2007).



Week 6



International Law and International Status: Past and Present



Required Readings:



19- Stephen D. Krasner, Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1999), chapter 1.



20- Jacques deLisle, “Taiwan: Sovereignty and Participation in International Organizations,” (July 2011), Foreign Policy Research Institute E-Notes



http://www.fpri.org/enotes/2011/201107.delisle.taiwan.html



21- Bruce Jacobs, “One China, diplomatic isolation and a separate Taiwan,’ in Edward Friedman ed., China Rise, Taiwan’s Dilemmas and International Peace (New York: Routledge, 2006), pp. 85-109.



22- Nancy B. Tucker,” John Foster Dulles and the Taiwan Roots of the Two China Policy,” in Richard H. Immerman, ed., John Foster Dulles and the Diplomacy of the Cold War (New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1990), pp. 235-262.



23- I Yuan, “Norm-centered Constructivism and Cross-Strait Relations,” Issues and Studies, (September 2012), Vol. 48, No. 3, pp. 75-104.



24- Stephen D. Krasner, ed., Problematic Sovereignty: Contested Rules and Political Possibilities (New York: Columbia University Press, 2001), chapters 1 and 6.



25-Tozun Balcheli et al., De Facto States: the Quest for Sovereignty (London and New York: Routledge, 2004), chapter 1.



Suggested Readings:



Stephen Krastner, “Who Gets a State, and Why?” Foreign Affairs 88, no. 2 (2009).



T.Y. Wang et al., “Taiwan’s Expansion of International Space: opportunities and challenges,” Journal of Contemporary China 20, no. 69 (March 2011): 249-267.



Czeslaw Tubilewicz, “Friends, Enemies or Frenemies: China-Taiwan Discord in the World Health Organization and its Significance,” Pacific Affairs 85, no. 4 (December 2012): 701-722. http://www.pacificaffairs.ubc.ca/recent-issues/recent-issue-vol-85-no-4-december-2012/



Vincent Wang, “Taiwan’s Participation in International Organizations,” in Edward Friedman, ed., China’s Rise, Taiwan’s Dilemmas and International Peace (New York: Routledge, 2005), pp. 149-173.



Jean-Marie Henckaerts, ed., The International Status of Taiwan in the New World Order: Legal and Political Considerations (London: Kulwer Law International, 1996).



David Ta-wei Lee, The Making of the Taiwan Relations Act: Twenty Years in Retrospect (Hong Kong: Oxford University Press, 2000), chapters 1, 2, 8.



Legal Status of Taiwan http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legal_status_of_Taiwan



The True Legal Status of Taiwan http://www.taiwannation.com.tw/english2.htm



State Succession in International Law, http://www.legalserviceindia.com/articles/insu.htm.



Nagendra Singh, “The UN and the Development of International Law,” in Roberts, Adam and Benedict Kingsbury, eds., United Nations, Divided World (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993), pp. 384-419.



Sigrid Winkler, “Taiwan’s UN Dilemma: To be or not to be, (2012)”, https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/taiwans-un-dilemma-to-be-or-not-to-be/



Week 7



ROC’s Mainland China Policy



Required Readings:



*DPP’s China Policy under President Tsai Ing-wen



26- Yu-Shan Wu, “Taiwan’s Domestic Politics and Cross-Strait Relations,“ The China Journal 53 (January 2005), pp. 35-60.



27- Lijun Sheng, China and Taiwan: Cross-Strait Relations under Chen Shui-bian (London: Zed Books, 2002).



28- I Yuan, “Cooperation under Anarchy? Paradoxes of the Intra-Chinese Rapprochement,” Issues & Studies, 31:2 (February 1995), pp. 54-66.



29- Chi Su, Taiwan’s Relations with Mainland China: A Tail Wagging Two Dogs (London and New York: Routledge, 2009), chapters 3, 7 and conclusion.



30- Inaugural address of President Tsai Ing-wen, http://english.president.gov.tw/Default.aspx?tabid=1574



31- I Yuan, “Analysis on Ma Ying-jeou’s Inaugural Address: Challenges and Prospects,” China International Strategic Review, (2012), pp. 174-183.



32- Steven M. Goldstein, Taiwan: Asia’s Orphan? NBR Special Report N.62 (2016), http://nbr.org/publications/specialreport/pdf/Free/02102017b/SR62_Taiwan_AsiasOrphan_December2016.pdf.



Suggested Readings:



Christopher R. Hughes, “New Trends in Taiwan’s China Policy,” The International Spectator 44, no. 2 (2009): 59-74.



Baohui Zhang, “Taiwan’s New Grand Strategy,” Journal of Contemporary China 20, no. 69 (March 2011): 269-285.



Chen Qimao, “The Taiwan Straits Situation since Ma came to office,” Journal of Contemporary China 20, no. 68 (January 2011): 153-160.



Michael Chase, Taiwan’s Security Policy: External Threats and Domestic Politics (Lynne Rienner, 2008). Chapter 1 (The Puzzle of Taiwan’s Security Policy) and Chapter 5 (Current Defense Policy in Taiwan).



Michael Hsiao and Jiann-Fa Yan, “Taiwan’s New National Identity and Its Impacts on Domestic Party Contention and Cross-Strait Relations,” in I Yuan, ed., Is There a Greater China Identity? (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2007), pp. 93-114.



Alan D. Romberg, “Shaping the Future: Part I: Domestic Developments in Taiwan,” China Leadership Monitor, No. 38, (August 6), 2012. http://www.hoover.org/research/shaping-future-part-i-domestic-developments-taiwan and Part II: “Cross-Strait Relations,” China Leadership Monitor, No. 39, (October 1), 2012, http://www.hoover.org/research/shaping-future-part-ii-cross-strait-relations



Alan D. Romberg, “The 2012 Taiwan Election: Off and Running,” China Leadership Monitor, No. 35, (Sep. 21), 2011. http://www.media.hoover.org/sites/defult/files/documents/ CLM.



Vincent C. Siew, “Cross-Strait at the Turing Point: Rooted in Taiwan but Connected to the World,” in I Yuan, ed., Cross-Strait at the Turning Point: Institution, Identity and Democracy (Taipei: Institute of International relations, 2008), chapter 1.



Week 8



PRC’s Taiwan Policy



Required Readings:



*De facto unification in progress



33- Yun-han Chu, “The Evolution of Beijing’s Taiwan Policy during the Reform,” in Yong Deng and Feiling Wang, eds., China Rising: Power and Motivation in Chinese Foreign Policy (Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, 2004).



34- Quansheng Zhao and Guoli Liu, “Beijing’s Shifting Positions in the New Era of Cross-Taiwan Strait Relations,” in Wei-Chin Lee, ed., Taiwan’s Politics in the 21th Century (New Jersey: World Scientific Publishing Co., 2010), chapter 8.



35- Ji You, “Rapprochement amidst Continued State of War: the Nexus of Politics and Threat of Force in Beijing’s Taiwan Policy.” paper presented at the 2011 Asia-Pacific Security Forum, Institute for National Policy Research (Taiwan), August 26, 2011.



36- Jacques deLisle, “Strait Ahead? China’s Fifth Generation Leaders and Beijing’s Taiwan Policy,” (July 2011), Foreign Policy Research Institute, E-Note http://www.fpri.org/enotes/2011/201107.delisle.chinatransition.pdf



37- Deng Xiaoping, Fundamental Issues in Present Day China (Beijing: Foreign Language Press, 1987), pp. 19-21, 48-52, 93-96.



38- Chi-hung Wei, “China-Taiwan Relations and the 1992 Consensus, 2000-2008,” International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, (June), 2015.



39-Alan D. Romberg, “Cross-Straits: Marking Time,” China Leadership Monitor, No. 53, (Spring, 2017), https://www.stimson.org/content/cross-strait-relations-marking-time.



Suggested Readings:



Denny Roy, Return of the Dragon: Rising China and Regional Security (New York: Columbia University Press, Jan. 2013). Chapter Ten (Taiwan in the PRC’s Lengthening Shadow).



Jing Huang, Inseparable Separation: The Making of China’s Taiwan Policy (World Scientific, 2010). Chapters 7-8.



Michael Chase, Taiwan’s Security Policy: External Threats and Domestic Politics (Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 2008). Chapter 4 (China’s Taiwan Policy and Military Modernization since 2000).



Paul Godwin and Alice Miller, China’s Forbearance Has Limits (Washington DC: Institute for National Strategic Studies, 2013): 37-45 (Signaling Case Studies: Taiwan).



John W. Lewis and Litai Xue, Imagined Enemies: China Prepares for Uncertain War (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006). Chapter 8 (Sun Tzu’s Pupils and the Taiwan Challenge).



Dennis Hickey, “Evolving Policy toward Taipei: Engagement or Entrapment?” in I Yuan, ed., Cross-Strait at the Turning Point: Institution, Identity and Democracy (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2008), chapter 9.



Alan D. Romberg, “Following the 18th Party Congress: Moving Forward Step-by-Step,” China Leadership Monitor, No. 40, (January 14), 2013. http://media.hoover.org/documents/CLM40AR.pdf.



Wang Jisi, “China’s Search for a Grand Strategy,” Foreign Affairs, March/April 2011, pp. 69-79.



Michael A. Glosny, “Getting Beyond Taiwan? Chinese Foreign Policy and PLA Modernization,” Strategic Forum, No. 26, INSS, National Defense University, January 2011, http://www.ndu.edu/inss.



Alan D. Romberg, Across the Taiwan Strait: From Confrontation to Cooperation, 2006-2012 (Washington, D.C.: Stimson Center, 2012).



Lee Yi-hu et al., The Taiwan Model of “One Country Two Systems” (in Chinese) (Beijing: Peoples Publisher, 2015).



Week 9



Mid-term Exam



Week 10



Economic Integration



Required Readings:



40- Shelley Rigger and Toy Reid, “Taiwanese Investors in Mainland China: Creating a Context for Peace?” in I Yuan, ed., Cross-Strait at the Turing Point: Institution, Identity and Democracy (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2008), chapter 5.



41- Murray Scott Tanner, Chinese Economic Coercion against Taiwan (Santa Monica, CA.: RAND, 2007). http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/MG507.html



42- Yun-han Chu, “The Political Economy of Taiwan’s Mainland Policy,” in Suisheng Zhao, ed., Across the Taiwan Strait: Mainland China, Taiwan, and the 1995-1996 Crisis (New York: Routledge, 1999).



43- Kenneth S. Lin, “Cross-Strait Economic Integration and Its Impacts on Taiwan’s Society,” in I Yuan, ed., Is There a Greater China Identity? (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2007), pp. 273-300.



44- Ching-chang Chen, “Useful Adversaries: How to Understand the Political Economy of Cross-Strait Security?” in Jean-Mare F. Blanchard and Dennis V. Hickey, eds., New Thinking about the Taiwan Issue: Theoretical Insights into its Origins, Dynamics and Prospects (London and New York: Routledge, 2012), chapter 3.



45- Scott L. Kastner, Political Conflict and Economic Interdependence across the Taiwan Strait and Beyond (Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press, 2009), chapter 6.



Suggested Readings:



Richard C. Bush. Uncharted Strait (Washington DC: Brookings, 2013), Chapter 4 (Economic Stabilization).



Daniel Rosen and Zhi Wang, The Implications of China-Taiwan Economic Liberalization (Washington DC: Peterson Institute, June 2011), Chapter 1 (pp. 5-49) and Chapter 5 (pp. 137-149) http://bookstore.piie.com/book-store/5010.html



Shelley Rigger, Why Taiwan Matters: Small Island, Global Powerhouse (Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, 2011). Chapter 6 (An Opportunity Full of Threats: Cross-Strait Economic Interaction).



Hsieh-Chao Chang and Wen-Cheng Lin, , “The Legal Framework for Cross-Strait Economic Normalization,” in I Yuan, ed., Cross-Strait at the Turning Point: Institution, Identity and Democracy ( Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2008), chapter 10.



Kevin G. Cai, ed., Cross-Strait Relations since 1978 (New Jersey: World Scientific Publishing Co., 2011), chapter 6.



You-tien Hsing, Making Capitalism in China: The Taiwan Connection (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998).



Julian Chang and Steve M. Goldstein, eds., Economic Reform and Cross-Strait Relations (New Jersey: World Scientific Publishing Co., 2007).



Week 11



Offense/Defense Postures



Required Readings:



*.The Department of Defense Indo-Pacific Strategy, 2019, https://media.defense.gov/2019/May/31/2002139210/-1/-1/1/DOD_INDO_PACIFIC_STRATEGY_REPORT_JUNE_2019.PDF.



*Ian Easton, The Chinese Invasion Threat (Washington, DC: Project 2049 Institute, 2017).



*Christopher Walker, Jassia Luding, “”From Soft Power to Sharper Power,” in Sharp Power: Rising Authoritarian Influence, (National Endowment for Democracy Forum Report (December 2017).



46- Christopher J. McCarthy, China’s Anti-Access/Area Denial: The Evolution of Modern Warfare, http://www.usnwc.edu/Lucent/OpenPdf.aspx?id=95&title.



47- Alan M. Wachman, Why Taiwan? Geostrategic Rationales for China’s Territorial Integrity (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2007), chapter 7.



48- John Wilson Lewis and Litai Xue, Imagined Enemies: China Prepares for Uncertain War (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006).



49- Phillip C. Saunders, “The Rebalance to Asia: U.S.-China Relations and Regional Security,” Strategic Forum, No. 281, (August 2013,) http://ndu.edu/inss.



50- I Yuan, “Cooperation and Conflict: The Offense-Defense Balance in Cross-Strait Relations,” Issues & Studies, 33:2 (February 1997), pp. 1-20.



51- Annual Report to Congress: Military and Security Developments involving the PRC 2016, (Washington, D.C.: Office of Secretary of Defense, 2016) http://www.defense.gov/Portals/1/Documents/pubs/2016%20China%20Military%20Power%20Report.pdf.



52- Scott L. Kastner, “Is the Taiwan Strait Still a Flash Point?”, International Security, Vol. 40, No. 3 (Winter 2015/2016), pp. 54-92.



53- Michael D. Swaine, Creating a Stable Asia: an Agenda for a U.S.-China Balance of Power (Washington, D.C.: CEIP, 2016), chapters 1, 2.



Suggested Readings:



Steven Tsang, ‘The US Military and American Commitment to Taiwan’s Security,” Asian Survey 52, no.4 (July/August 2012).



Andrew Erickson and David Yang, “On the Verge of a Game-Changer,” Proceedings Magazine 135 (May 2009).



http://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/2009-05/verge-game-changer



Robert S. Ross, “Navigating the Taiwan Strait: Deterrence, Escalation Dominance, and U.S.-China Relations,” International Security 27, no. 2 (Fall 2002): 48-85.



David Lai, Asia-Pacific: A Strategic Assessment (Carlisle, PA.; U.S. War College, 2013)



I Yuan, “Confidence-Building across the Taiwan Strait as a Peace Zone Proposal,” Working Papers by CNAPS Visiting Fellows, Brookings Institution, No.11, 2000, http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/.../northeastasia-yuan.



Week 12



US-China-Taiwan Triangle Relations



Required Readings:



*Lowell Dittmer, China’s Asia: Triangular Dynamics since the Cold War (Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2018), chapter 5.



*Robert Sutter, “Washington’s “Whole-of-Government” Push back against Chinese Challenges,” PAC NET # 26, April 23, 2019, https://www.pacforum.org/sites/default/files/20190423_PacNet_26.pdf.



*Annual Report to Congress: Military and Security Developments involving the PRC 2019 (Washington, DC: Office of the Secretary of Defense, 2019),



https://media.defense.gov/2019/May/02/2002127082/-1/-1/1/2019_CHINA_MILITARY_POWER_REPORT.pdf.



*National Security Strategy of the United States of America (Washington, DC: the White House, 2017), https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/NSS-Final-12-18-2017-0905.pdf.



*Summary of the National Defense Strategy of the United States of America 2018, https://www.defense.gov/Portals/1/Documents/pubs/2018-National-Defense-Strategy-Summary.pdf.



54- Scott L. Kastner, “Mostly Bark, Little Bite? Modeling U.S. Arms Sales to Taiwan and the Chinese Responses,” Issues and Studies, September 2013. http://iiro.nccu.edu.tw/index.php?include=article&id=2922



55- Nancy Bernkopf Tucker and Bonnie Glaser, “Should the US Abandon Taiwan?” Washington Quarterly, Fall 2011, pp. 23-37.



56- Shirley A. Kan and Wayne M. Morrison, “U.S.-Taiwan Relationship: Overview of Policy Issues,” CRS Report for Congress, (April 22, 2014). http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/R41952.pdf



57- Dennis V. Hickey, “Rapprochement between Taiwan and the Chinese Mainland: Implications for American Foreign Policy,” Journal of Contemporary China (March, 2011), 20(69), pp. 231-247.



58- Mark Stokes and Sabrina Tsai, “The United States and Future Policy Options in the Taiwan Strait,” (February 2016), Project 2049 Institute, http://www.project2049.net/documents/Future_US%20Policy%20Options%20in%20the%20Taiwan%20Strait_Project%202049.pdf.



59- Ian Easton, “Strategic Standoff: the US-China Rivalry and Taiwan,” (March 2016), Project 2049 Institute, http://www.project2049.net/documents/Strategic%20Standoff_US_China_Rivalry_Taiwan.pdf/.



60- John J. Mearsheimer, “Say Goodbye to Taiwan,” The National Interest, (March-April 2014), http://nationalinterest.org/article/say-goodbye-taiwan-9931.



61- Richard C. Bush, An One-China Policy Primer (Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, 2017).



62- Richard C. Bush, “Taiwan’s January 2016 Election and Their Implications for Relations with China and the United States,” Asia Working Group Paper 1, (December 2015), https://www.brookings.edu/research/taiwans-january-2016-elections-and-their-implications-for-relations-with-china-and-the-united-states/.



Suggested Readings:



Edward Friedman, “China’s Ambitions, America’s Interests, Taiwan’s Destiny and Asia’s Future,” Asian Survey 53, no. 2 (March/April 2013).



Richard C. Bush. Unchartered Strait (Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 2013), Chapters 5-6.



Shelley Rigger, “Why Giving Up Taiwan Will Not Help Us with China,” American Enterprise Institute (November 2011).



http://www.aei.org/article/foreign-and-defense-policy/regional/asia/why-giving-up-taiwan-will-not-help-us-with-china/



Nancy Bernkopf Tucker, ed., Dangerous Strait: The U.S.-Taiwan-China Crisis (New York: Columbia University Press, 2005).



Richard C. Bush, At Cross Purposes: U.S.-Taiwan Relations since 1942 (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2004).



Richard C. Bush, “An American Perspective on Maritime Asia,” a speech delivered at the East China Sea Peace Forum, August 5, 2013, http://www.brookngs.edu/~/media/research/files/speechs/20american%20perspective%20maritime%20asia%20bush.pdf.



Dennis V. Hickey, “US Policy and the New Taiwan,” in I Yuan, ed., Is There a Greater China Identity? (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2007), pp. 319-344.



Lung-chu Chen, The US-Taiwan-China Relationship in International Law and Policy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016)



Week 13



Alternative Views on Political History: the Impact of Culture, and Power on Changing Identities



Required Readings:



*Ming-sho Ho, Challenging Beijing’s Mandate of Heaven: Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement and Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2019), https://carnegieendowment.org/2018/08/02/activist-legacy-of-taiwan-s-sunflower-movement-pub-.



63- Ya-chung Chang, Cross Strait Integration and Peaceful Development (Taipei: Far Eastern Group, 2011), https://www.amazon.com/Integration-Peaceful-Development.../B01KN..



64- Ya-chung Chang, “A Modest Proposal for a Basic Agreement on Peaceful Cross-Strait Development“, Journal of Current Chinese Affairs, Vol.39, No.1, (2011), http://journals.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jcca/article/view/203



65- Douglas Mendel, The Politics of Formosan Nationalism (Berkeley and Los Angles: University of California Press, 1970).



66- George H. Gerr, Formosa Betrayed (London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1966),



http://www.pinyin.info/books/formosabetrayed/index.html.



67- Melissa J. Brown, Is Taiwan Chinese? (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004), chapter 6.



68- Chengxin Pan, “Normative Convergences and cross-Strait Divergence,” in Jean-Mare F. Blanchard and Dennis V. Hickey, eds., New Thinking about the Taiwan Issue: Theoretical Insights into its Origins, Dynamics and Prospects (London and New York: Routledge, 2012), chapter 2.



69- Hui-Ching Chang and Richard Holt, Languages, Politics and Identity in Taiwan (London & New York: Routledge, 2015),



Suggested Readings:



Shelley Rigger, “Taiwan’s Rising Rationalism: Generations, Politics, and Taiwanese Nationalism,” East-West Center Washington, Policy Studies 26 (2006).



Shelley Rigger, “Looking toward the Future in the Taiwan Strait: Generational Politics in Taiwan,” SAIS Review of International Affairs 31, no. 2 (Summer-Fall 2011): 65-77.



Robert Ross, “Taiwan’s Fading Independence Movement,” Foreign Affairs 85, no. 2 (March/April 2006): 141-148.



Daniel C. Lynch, ‘Taiwan’s Self-Conscious Nation-Building Project,” Asian Survey 44, no. 4 (July/August 2004).



A. Rubinstein, ed., Taiwan: A New History (Armonk, New York: M.E. Sharpe, 1999).



Danny Roy, Taiwan: A Political History (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003).



Week 14



Whither Cross-Strait Relations



Required Readings:



*President Tsai’s statement on termination of diplomatic relations with El Salvador (2018-08-21), https://english.president.gov.tw/NEWS/5492.



*Michael J. Mazarr, Timothy R. Heath, Astrid Stuth Cevallos, China and International Order (Santa Monica, Ca.,: RAND, 2018).



*Ryan L. Hass, Cross-Taiwan Strait Relations: Triangular Dynamics (New York: National Committee on American Foreign Policy, 2019).



70- Shelley Rigger, “Strawberry Jam: National Identity, Cross-Strait Relations and Taiwan Youth,” in I Yuan, ed., Is There a Greater China Identity? (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2007), pp. 115-136.



71- Bruce Gilley, “Policy Succession and the Next Cross-Strait Crisis,” Asia Policy, No. 16, (July 2013), pp. 139-159.



72- Phillip C. Saunders and Scott L. Kastner, “Bridge over Troubled Water? Envisioning a China-Taiwan Peace Agreement,” International Security, Vol. 33, No. 4 (Spring 2009), pp. 87-114.



73- Robert Sutter, Taiwan’s Future: Narrowing Strait (May 2011), National Bureau of Research Analysis, http://www.nbr.



74- Shelley Rigger, Why Taiwan Matters (Lanham, MD.: Rowan and Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2011).



75- Richard C. Bush, Uncharted Strait: The Future of China-Taiwan Relations (Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press, 2013), conclusion.



76- Yun-han Chu, “Taiwan’s National Identity Politics and the Prospect of Cross-Strait Relations,” Asian Survey, Vol. 44, Issue 4, (2004), pp. 484-512.



77- Chi-Hao Huang and Patrick James,” Blue, Green or Aquamarine? Taiwan and the Status Quo Preference in Cross-Strait Relations,” The China Quarterly (Sep. 2014), pp.670-692.



78- T. J. Cheng and Wei-chin Lee, eds., National Security, Public Opinion and Regime Asymmetry (New Jersey: World Scientific, 2017), chapter 2.



Suggested Readings:



Shelley Rigger, “Taiwan’s democratization and mainland China’s future,” in Zhou, Rigger and White (eds.), Democratization in China, Korea and Southeast Asia? Local and National Perspectives, (Routledge: New York, 2014). Chapter 3.



Bruce Gilley, “Not so dire straits: How the Finlandization of Taiwan benefits US Security,” Foreign Affairs (2009). http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/65901/bruce-gilley/not-so-dire-straits



Richard C. Bush, “The Social Foundation of Taiwan’s Future,” Brookings Institution (June 2010). http://www.brookings.edu/research/speeches/2010/06/13-taiwan-bush



Jacques deLisle, “Vicious Cycles and Virtuous Circles: International Context, Taiwan Democracy and Cross-Strait Relations,” in I Yuan, ed., Cross-Strait at the Turning Point: Institution, Identity and Democracy (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2008), chapter 15.



Ralph A. Cossa, “Identity Challenges and Taiwan-U.S.-China Relations,” in I Yuan, ed., Is There a Greater China Identity? (Taipei: Institute of International Relations, 2007), pp. 301-318.



Week 15



Student Presentations (1)



Week 16



Student Presentations (2)



Week 17



Jan. 07, 2019 Student Presentations (3)



Week 18



Papers due



End of semester



Evaluations:



Class Participation and Assignments 30%



Mid-term Exam 30%



Term Paper 40%



*All term papers are due no later than the 20th of January, 2020. The length of the term paper is about 15-20 pages with endnotes and bibliography. Late papers will be penalized.


Teaching Methods
Teaching Assistant

Cross-Strait Relations between Mainland China and Taiwan:



Theories and Practice



Tuesday 10:00 a.m.-01:00 p.m.



Fall, 2019



Adjunct Prof. I Yuan (袁易)



Institute of International Relations



National Chengchi University



E-mail:yyuan@nccu.edu.tw



Office Hours: by appointment


Requirement/Grading

Evaluations:



Class Participation and Assignments 30%



Mid-term Exam 30%



Term Paper 40%



 



*All term papers are due no later than the 20th of January, 2020. The length of the term paper is about 15-20 pages with endnotes and bibliography. Late papers will be penalized.



 


Textbook & Reference
Urls about Course
Attachment