SemesterSpring Semester, 2020
DepartmentGraduate Institute of Deveopment Studies MA Program, First Year Graduate Institute of Deveopment Studies PhD Program, First Year Graduate Institute of Deveopment Studies MA Program, Second Year Graduate Institute of Deveopment Studies PhD Program, Second Year
Course NameTransnational Human Rights Advocacy
InstructorHUANG JAW-NIAN
Credit3.0
Course TypeElective
Prerequisite
Course Objective
Course Description
Course Schedule



























































































































































Week



Date



Theme/Activity



Learning Hours



Class



Preparation



1



2/20



Introduction



3



0



2



2/27



The Concept of Human Rights




  • Donnelly, Jack. 2007. “The Relative Universality of Human Rights.” Human Rights Quarterly 29 (2): 281–306.

  • Goodhart, Michael. 2008. “Neither Relative nor Universal: A Response to Donnelly.” Human Rights Quarterly 30 (1): 183–93.



Suggested:





3



5



International Institutions and HR Promotion



3



3/5



Do HR Treaties Work? – International-level Discussions




  • Hathaway, Oona A. 2002. “Do Human Rights Treaties Make a Difference?” The Yale Law Journal 111 (8): 1935–2042.

  • Goodman, R., and D. Jinks. 2004. “How to Influence States: Socialization and International Human Rights Law.” Duke Law Journal 54 (3): 621–703.



3



5



4



3/12



Do HR Treaties Work? – Domestic-level Discussions




  • Powell, Emilia Justyna, and Jeffrey K. Staton. 2009. “Domestic Judicial Institutions and Human Rights Treaty Violation.” International Studies Quarterly 53 (1): 149–74.

  • Simmons, Beth A. 2009. Mobilizing for Human Rights: International Law in Domestic Politics. Cambridge University Press.



3



5



Economic Incentives and HR Promotion



5



3/19



Is Respect for HR Buyable? – The Effects of Trade




  • Hafner-Burton, Emilie M. 2005. “Trading Human Rights: How Preferential Trade Agreements Influence Government Repression.” International Organization 59 (3).

  • Gray, Mark M., Miki Caul Kittilson, and Wayne Sandholtz. 2006. “Women and Globalization: A Study of 180 Countries, 1975–2000.” International Organization 60 (2).

  • Prakash, Aseem, and Matthew Potoski. 2006. “Racing to the Bottom? Trade, Environmental Governance, and ISO 14001.” American Journal of Political Science 50 (2): 350–364.



3



5



6



3/26



Movie Discussion



3



1



7



4/2



Holiday (No Class)


   

8



4/9



Is Respect for HR Buyable? – The Effects of FDIs




  • Richards, D. L., R. D. Gelleny, and D. H. Sacko. 2001. “Money with a Mean Streak? Foreign Economic Penetration and Government Respect for Human Rights in Developing Countries.” International Studies Quarterly 45 (2): 219–239.

  • Mosley, L., and S. Uno. 2007. “Racing to the Bottom or Climbing to the Top? Economic Globalization and Collective Labor Rights.” Comparative Political Studies, no. 40(July).

  • Cole, Matthew A., Robert J. R. Elliott, and Per G. Fredriksson. 2006. “Endogenous Pollution Havens: Does FDI Influence Environmental Regulations?” Scandinavian Journal of Economics 108 (1): 157–78.



3



5



9



4/16



Is Respect for HR Really Rewarded?




  • Blanton, Shannon Lindsey. 2000. “Promoting Human Rights and Democracy in the Developing World: U.S. Rhetoric versus U.S. Arms Exports.” American Journal of Political Science 44 (1): 123–31.

  • Neumayer, Eric. 2003. “Is Respect for Human Rights Rewarded? An Analysis of Total Bilateral and Multilateral Aid Flows.” Human Rights Quarterly 25 (2): 510–27.

  • Blanton, Shannon Lindsey, and Robert G. Blanton. 2007. “What Attracts Foreign Investors? An Examination of Human Rights and Foreign Direct Investment.” Journal of Politics 69 (1): 143–155.



3



5



Reputational Sanctions and HR Promotion



10



4/23



What Can Non-State Actors do? – Naming, Framing, and Shaming




  • Ron, J., H. Ramos, and K. Rodgers. 2005. “Transnational Information Politics: NGO Human Rights Reporting, 1986–2000.” International Studies Quarterly 49 (3): 557–588. [naming]

  • Weldon, S. Laurel. 2006. “Inclusion, Solidarity, and Social Movements: The Global Movement against Gender Violence.” Perspectives on Politics 4 (1): 55–74. [framing]

  • Mertus, Julie. 2007. “The Rejection of Human Rights Framings: The Case of LGBT Advocacy in the US.” Human Rights Quarterly 29 (4): 1036–64. [framing]

  • Hafner-Burton, E. M. 2008. “Sticks and Stones: Naming and Shaming the Human Rights Enforcement Problem.” International Organization 62 (4): 689–716. [shaming]

  • Murdie, Amanda M., and David R. Davis. 2012. “Shaming and Blaming: Using Events Data to Assess the Impact of Human Rights INGOs1.” International Studies Quarterly 56 (1): 1–16. [shaming]



3



5



Transnational Advocacy Networks (TANs) and HR Promotion



11



4/30



How Do TANs Work? – The Spiral Model




  • Risse, Thomas, Stephen C. Ropp, and Kathryn Sikkink. 1999. The Power of Human Rights: International Norms and Domestic Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  • Cohen, Stanley. 2001. States of Denial: Knowing about Atrocities and Suffering. 1sted. Polity.



3



5



12



5/7



Movie Discussion



3



1



13



5/14



How Do TANs Work? – The Boomerang Model




  • Keck, Margaret E., and Kathryn Sikkink. 1998. Activists beyond Borders: Advocacy Networks in International Politics. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

  • Bob, Clifford. 2005. The Marketing of Rebellion: Insurgents, Media, and International Activism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.



3



5



14



5/21



How Do TANs Work? – The Life Cycle of a Norm




  • Finnemore, Martha, and Kathryn Sikkink. 1998. “International Norm Dynamics and Political Change.” International Organization 25 (4): 887–917.

  • Sikkink, Kathryn. 2011. The Justice Cascade: How Human Rights Prosecutions Are Changing World Politics. W. W. Norton & Company. [A case of transitional justice norms]



3



5



15



5/28



How Do TANs Work? – The Role of Local Actors




  • Merry, Sally Engle. 2006. “Transnational Human Rights and Local Activism: Mapping the Middle.” American Anthropologist 108 (1): 38–51.

  • Mihr, Anja, and Hans Peter Schmitz. 2007. “Human Rights Education (HRE) and Transnational Activism.” Human Rights Quarterly 29 (4): 973–93.

  • Kurasawa, Fuyuki. 2007. The Work of Global Justice: Human Rights as Practices. Cambridge University Press.



3



5



Human Rights Advocacy in Taiwan



16



6/4



Human Rights Advocacy in Taiwan




  • Chen, Yu-Jie. 2019. “Isolated but Not Oblivious: Taiwan’s Acceptance of the Two Major Human Rights Covenants.” In Taiwan and International Human Rights: A Story of Transformation, edited by Jerome A. Cohen, William P. Alford, and Chang-fa Lo, 207–25. Economics, Law, and Institutions in Asia Pacific. Singapore: Springer.

  • Chen, Chun-Hung, and Hung-Ling Yeh. 2019. “The Battlefield of Transitional Justice in Taiwan: A Relational View.” In Taiwan and International Human Rights: A Story of Transformation, edited by Jerome A. Cohen, William P. Alford, and Chang-fa Lo, 67–80. Economics, Law, and Institutions in Asia Pacific. Singapore: Springer.

  • Kuan, Hsiaowei. 2019. “LGBT Rights in Taiwan—The Interaction Between Movements and the Law.” In Taiwan and International Human Rights: A Story of Transformation, edited by Jerome A. Cohen, William P. Alford, and Chang-fa Lo, 593–607. Economics, Law, and Institutions in Asia Pacific. Singapore: Springer.



3



5



17



6/11



Movie Discussion



3



1



18



6/18



Final Exam Week (No Class)


   

Teaching Methods
Teaching Assistant
Requirement/Grading

  1. Attendance (20% of course grade): Students are required to come to classes. The grade is decided by the student's level of attendance.

  2. Participation (20% of course grade): Students are expected to read assigned readings and participate in class discussions. The grade is decided by the quantity and quality of the student's engagement in the class. 

  3. Assigned reading guide (30% of course grade): Each student will have the opportunity to serve as a lead discussant for about two assigned readings during the semester. He or she must present the assigned reading, provide comments, and raise questions to facilitate class discussions.

  4. Written thinkpieces (30% of course grade): Students are required to write a one-page thought paper based on the assigned readings every week. The paper must be submitted to the teacher on the day before the class every week. (Note: This weekly paper is the only written assignment for this course. There will be no final paper for this course.)


Textbook & Reference
Urls about Course
Attachment