SemesterSpring Semester, 2020
DepartmentInternational Master's Program in International Studies, First Year International Master's Program in International Studies, Second Year
Course NameRussian Foreign Policy
InstructorLIN YUNG-FANG
Credit3.0
Course TypeElective
Prerequisite
Course Objective
Course Description
Course Schedule































































































































































週次



Week



課程主題



Topic



課程內容與指定閱讀



Content and Reading Assignment



教學活動與作業



Teaching Activities and Homework



學習投入時間



Student workload expectation



課堂講授



In-class Hours



課程前後



Outside-of-class Hours



1



 



Course Introduction



The weekly topic is assigned with two articles (journal articles or book chapters).



A detailed syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.



Twice a semester, students must prepare a ten-minute oral presentation, based on one of the assigned articles of their choice.



3



0



2



 



Tsarist and Soviet Foreign Policy




  • Robert H. Donaldson, Joseph L. Nogee, and Vidya Nadkarni, The Foreign Policy of Russia: Changing Systems, Enduring Interests, 5th ed. (Armonk, NY: M. E. Sharpe, 2014), ch. 2.

  • Donaldson, Nogee, and Nadkarni, The Foreign Policy of Russia, 5th ed., chs. 3-4.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



3



The Sources and Making of Russian Foreign Policy




  • Donaldson, Nogee, and Nadkarni, The Foreign Policy of Russia, 5th ed., ch. 5.

  • Nikolas K. Gvosdev and Christopher Marsh, Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors (Los Angeles, CA: CQ Press, 2014), ch.2.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



4



The Return of Global Russia




  • Elias Gotz and Camille-Renaud Merlen, “Russia and the Question of World Order,” European Politics and Society, Vol. 20, No. 2 (2019), pp. 133-153.

  • Paul Stronski and Richard Sokolsky, “The Return of Global Russia: An Analytical Framework,” Carnegie Endowment for International Peace,



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



5



Eurasianism and Greater Eurasia




  • Peter J. Katzenstein and Nicole Weygandt, “Mapping Eurasia in an Open World: How the Insularity of Russia’s Geopolitical and Civilizational Approaches Limits Its Foreign Policies,” Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 15, No. 2 (June 2017), pp. 428-442.

  • David G. Lewis, “Geopolitical Imaginaries in Russian Foreign Policy: The Evolution of ‘Greater Eurasia’,” Europe-Asia Studies, Vol. 70, No. 10 (Dec. 2018), pp. 1612-1637.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



6



The Social Construction of Russia’s Resurgence




  • Andrei P. Tsygankov, Russia’s Foreign Policy: Change and Continuity in National Identity, 4th ed. (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2016), ch. 1.

  • Deborah Welch Larson, “Russia Says No: Power, Status, and Emotions in Foreign Policy,” Communist and Post-Communist Studies 47 (2014), pp. 269-279.



 



 



0



0



7



Soft Power and Russian Foreign Policy




  • Valentina Feklyunina, “Soft Power and Identity: Russia, Ukraine and the ‘Russian World(s)’,” European Journal of International Relations, Vol. 22, No. 4 (2016), pp. 773-796.

  • Anna Matveeva, “Russia’s Power Projection after the Ukraine Crisis,” Europe-Asia Studies, Vol. 70, No. 5 (July 2018), pp. 711-737.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



8



Hard Power and Russian Foreign Policy




  • Bettina Renz, “Russian Responses to the Changing Character of War,” International Affairs, Vol. 95, No. 4 (2019), pp. 817-834.

  • Kristin Ven Bruusgaard, “Russian Strategic Deterrence,” Survival, Vol. 58, No. 4 (August-September 2016), pp. 7-26.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



9



Conflict and Cooperation in the Post-Soviet Region I



 




  • Andrej Krickovic and Maxim Bratersky, “Benevolent Hegemon, Neighborhood Bully, or Regional Security Provider? Russia’s Efforts to Promote Regional Integration after the 2013-2014 Ukraine Crisis,” Eurasian Geography and Economics, Vol. 57, No. 2 (2016), pp. 180-202.

  • Jeanne L. Wilson, “The Russian Pursuit of Regional Hegemony,” Rising Powers Quarterly, Vol. 2, No. 1 (2017), pp. 7-25.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



10



Conflict and Cooperation in the Post-Soviet Region II




  • Tatyana Malyarenko and Stefan Wolff, “The Logic of Competitive Influence-Seeking: Russia, Ukraine, and the Conflict in Donbas,” Post-Soviet Affairs, Vol. 34, No. 4 (2018), pp. 191-212.

  • Paul D’Anieri, “Magical Realism: Assumptions, Evidence and Prescriptions in the Ukraine Conflict,” Eurasian Geography and Economics, Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019), pp. 97-117.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



11



Russia and the EU/NATO




  • Marco Siddi, “The Role of Power in EU-Russia Energy Relations: The Interplay between Markets and Geopolitics,” Europe-Asia Studies, Vol. 70, No. 10 (Dec. 2018), pp. 1552-1571.

  • Andrei P. Tsygankov, “The Sources of Russia’s Fear of NATO,” Communist and Post-Communist Studies 51 (2018), pp. 101-111.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



12



Russia and the United States




  • Andrew C. Kuchins, “Mismatched Partners: US-Russia Relations after the Cold War,” in David Cadier and Margot Light, eds., Russia’s Foreign Policy: Ideas, Domestic Politics and External Relations (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), ch. 7.

  • Eugene Rumer and Richard Sokolsky, “Thirty Years of U.S. Policy Toward Russia: Can the Vicious Circle Be Broken?” Carnegie Endowment for International Peace,



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



13



Russia and Asia




  • Stephen Fortescue, “Russia’s ‘Turn to the East’: A Study in Policy Making,” Post-Soviet Affairs, Vol. 32, No. 5 (2016), pp. 423-454.

  • Glenn Diesen, “The Geoeconomics of the Russian-Japanese Territorial Dispute,” Asian Survey, Vol. 58, No. 3 (2018), pp. 582-605.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



14



Athletic contests, University anniversary



 



 



0



0



15



Russia and China




  • Elizabeth Wishnick, “In Search of the ‘Other’ in Asia: Russia-China Relations Revisited,” The Pacific Review, Vol. 30, No. 1 (2017), pp. 114-132.

  • Tom Roseth, “Moscow’s Response to a Rising China: Russia’s Partnership Policies in Its Military Relations with Beijing,” Problems of Post-Communism, Vol. 66, No. 4 (2019), pp. 268-286.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



16



Russia and the Middle East




  • Nikolay Kozhanov, “Russian Policy Across the Middle East: Motivations and Methods,” Russia and Eurasian Programme, Chatham House,

  • Julie Wilhelmsen, “Putin’s Power Revisited: How Identity Positions and Great Power Interaction Condition Strategic Cooperation on Syria,” Europe-Asia Studies, Vol. 71, No. 7 (September 2019), pp. 1091-1121.



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



17



Russia and Latin America, and Africa




  • Elena Pavlova, “A Russian Challenge to Multipolarity? The Prospects for Political Cooperation between Russia and Latin America,” Problems of Post-Communism, Vol. 65, No. 6 (2018), pp. 394-408.

  • Paul Stronski, “Late to the Party: Russia’s Return to Africa,” Carnegie Endowment for International Peace,



 



Discussion/Lecture/Presentation/Reading



3



6



18



Final Paper



 



Discussion



0



0



Teaching Methods
Teaching Assistant
Requirement/Grading


  • Class participation (25%): Students are expected to attend regularly, to read the assigned readings, and to actively participate in class discussions.




  • Presentations (25%): Each student is required to give three ten-minute oral presentations. The first two are to present reviews of the assigned readings of the weekly topic, and the final one is to present the research proposal of the final paper.




  • Final paper (50%): Each student is required to write a research paper (5,000-8,000 words) related to the topics covered in the course.




Textbook & Reference


  • Robert H. Donaldson, Joseph L. Nogee and Vidya Nadkarni, The Foreign Policy of Russia: Changing Systems, Enduring Interests, 5th ed. (Armonk, NY: M. E. Sharpe, 2014).




  • David Cadier and Margot Light, eds., Russia’s Foreign Policy: Ideas, Domestic Politics and External Relations (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015).




  • Nikolas K. Gvosdev and Christopher Marsh, Russian Foreign Policy: Interests, Vectors, and Sectors (Los Angeles, CA: CQ Press, 2014).




  • Andrei P. Tsygankov, Russia’s Foreign Policy: Change and Continuity in National Identity, 4th ed. (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2016).




  • Andrei P. Tsygankov, ed., Routledge Handbook of Russian Foreign Policy (New York: Routledge, 2018)




  • Natalia Tsvetkova, ed., Russia and the World: Understanding International Relations (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2017).




Urls about Course
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